Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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bless you, for you are entwined around my heart  with ties that are stronger than death; and time  cannot sever them.— deprived of your society, and  that of my prattling babes, life would be irksome. — Oh that we may all live and enjoy health  and prosperity until the coming of the son of Man;  that we may be a Comfort to each other, and enstil  into the tender and noble minds of our children,  principles of truth and virtue, which shall abide with  them forever, is my constant prayer.— From your , who will ever remain devoted and affectionate  both in time and in eternity.
 
While was at work in the before  mentioned cellar he took a severe pain in his side,  which was never altogether removed. About a fortni ght prior to his death, his family were very sick;  and in taking care of them, he caught a violent  cold— a fever set in, and the pain in his side incre ased, and, with all our exertions, we were unable to  arrest the disease; which, I have no doubt, was con sumption, brought on by working in a damp room, in  which he printed this paper. [p. 330]
bless you, for you are entwined around my heart with ties that are stronger than death; and time cannot sever them.— deprived of your society, and that of my prattling babes, life would be irksome.— Oh that we may all live and enjoy health and prosperity until the coming of the son of Man; that we may be a Comfort to each other, and enstil into the tender and noble minds of our children, principles of truth and virtue, which shall abide with them forever, is my constant prayer.— From your , who will ever remain devoted and affectionate both in time and in eternity.
 
While was at work in the before mentioned cellar he took a severe pain in his side, which was never altogether removed. About a fortnight prior to his death, his family were very sick; and in taking care of them, he caught a violent cold— a fever set in, and the pain in his side increased, and, with all our exertions, we were unable to arrest the disease; which, I have no doubt, was consumption, brought on by working in a damp room, in which he printed his paper. [p. 330]
Page 330