Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 39
image
Chapter 11
Chap. 11.
 
Sickness in Randolph.
 
We <had> lived in Randolph but six months, when I took a heavy cold, which caused a severe cough; and, to relieve which, every possible exertion was made; but all in vain. A hectic fever set in, which threatened to prove fatal; and the physician pronouned my case to be, confirmed consumption. During this sickness my mother watched over me with much anxiety, sparing herself not pains, in administering to my comfort; yet, I continued to grow weaker and weaker until I could scarcely endure, even a foot fall upon the floor, except in stocking foot; and no one was allowed to speak in the room above a whisper. While I was in this situation, a Methodist exhorter, hearing of my sickness, came to see me. When he came to the door, he knoocked in his usual manner; and his knocking so, agitated me, that it was a considerable length of time before my nerves became altogether quieted again.
My mother motioned him to a chair, and, in a whisper informed him of my situation, which prevented his asking me any questions. He tarried some time, and while he sat he seemed to meditate deeply upon the uncertainty of my recovering; also to have a great desire to converse with me upon the subject of my dying. As he thus sat pondering, I fancied to myself, that he was going to ask me, if was prepared to die; and I dreaded to have him speak to me; for then I did not consider myself ready for such an awful event, inasmuch as I knew not the ways of Christ; besides, there appeared to be a dark and lonesome chasm between me and the Savior, which I dare not attempt to pass. I thought [p. 39]
Chapter 11
Chap. 11.
 
Sickness in Randolph.
 
We had lived in Randolph but six months, when I took a heavy cold, which caused a severe cough; and, to relieve which, every possible exertion was made; but all in vain. A hectic fever set in, which threatened to prove fatal; and the physician pronouned my case to be, confirmed consumption. During this sickness my mother watched over me with much anxiety, sparing herself no pains, in administering to my comfort; yet, I continued to grow weaker and weaker until I could scarcely endure, even a foot fall upon the floor, except in stocking foot; and no one was allowed to speak in the room above a whisper. While I was in this situation, a Methodist exhorter, , came to see me. When he came to the door, he knoocked in his usual manner; and his knocking so, agitated me, that it was a considerable length of time before my nerves became altogether quieted again.
My mother motioned him to a chair, and, in a whisper informed him of my situation, which prevented his asking me any questions. He tarried some time, and while he sat he seemed to meditate deeply upon the uncertainty of my recovering; also to have a great desire to converse with me upon the subject of my dying. As he thus sat pondering, I fancied to myself, that he was going to ask me, if was prepared to die; and I dreaded to have him speak to me; for then I did not consider myself ready for such an awful event, inasmuch as I knew not the ways of Christ; besides, there appeared to be a dark and lonesome chasm between me and the Savior, which I dare not attempt to pass. I thought [p. 39]
Page 39