Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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dollars for what he had; but my refused his  offer, as it was only about two thirds of its real value;  and told the gentleman, that he would rather venture ship ping it himself.
In a short time my went to the city of with the view of shipping his gen sang <Ginseng>; and finding  a vessel, which was soon to <set> sail, he made arrangements  with the captain in this wise: that for the captain was  to sell this gen sang <Ginseng> in China and take it bring him <the> avails  of the [illegible] thereof to my : which the captain (the captain)  bound himself to do, in a written obligation.
Mr Stevens, hearing of this, repaired immediately  to the , above mentioned; and, by taking much  pains assistance found the ship vessel, on board of which   had shipped his gen sang <Ginseng>; and having some  of the same article on hand himself, he made arrange ments with the Captain to take his also; and he was  to send his son along with it, in order to take ch arge of it. According to circumstances which  afterwards which afterwards transpired, the gen sang <it Ginseng>  was taken to China, and disposed of there to good  advantage, or at a high price; but not to much  advantage to us; for we never received aught except  a small chest of tea from this adventure. When  the vessel returned, Stevens the younger returned with  it; and, as soon as my became aware of  this fact, he went immediately to him, and inquired  respecting the success of the Captain in selling his <Ginseng> gen- sang. Mr. Stevens told him quite a plausible tale,  the particulars of which I have forgotton; but the  amount was, that the sale had been a perfect fail ure, and the only thing which had been brought for  him from China, was a small chest of tea, which  had been delivered into his care [p. 43]
dollars for what he had; but my refused his offer, as it was only about two thirds of its real value; and told the gentleman, that he would rather venture shipping it himself.
In a short time my went to the city of with the view of shipping his Ginseng; and finding a vessel, which was soon to set sail, he made arrangements with the captain in this wise: for the captain to sell his Ginseng in China and bring him the avails thereof to my : which he (the captain) bound himself to do, in a written obligation.
Mr Stevens, hearing of this, repaired immediately to the , above mentioned; and, by taking much pains found the vessel, on board of which had shipped his Ginseng; and having some of the same article on hand himself, he made arrangements with the Captain to take his also; and he was to send his son along with it, in order to take charge of it. According to circumstances which afterwards transpired, the it was taken to China, and disposed of there to good advantage, or at a high price; but not to much advantage to us; for we never received aught except a small chest of tea from this adventure. When the vessel returned, Stevens the younger returned with it; and, as soon as my became aware of this fact, he went immediately to him, and inquired respecting the success of the Captain in selling his Ginseng . Mr. Stevens told him quite a plausible tale, the particulars of which I have forgotton; but the amount was, that the sale had been a perfect failure, and the only thing which had been brought for him from China, was a small chest of tea, which [p. 43]
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