Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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had been placed in his care to be delivered to him ()
by In a short time afterwards, young Stevens hired a  house of my brother Stephen, and employed eight or  ten hands, and commenced the business of chrystalizing  gen sang <Ginseng>. When he had got fairly at work, Stephen went  to see him, and, as it happened, found him considerably  intoxicated. When My brother, <on> approached approaching him, he spoke  him him thus: “Well, Mr. Stevens, you are doing a fine  business; you will soon be ready for another trip to China.”  Then, in quite a careless and indifferent manner, observed  again: “Oh, Mr. Stevens how much did ’s  adventure bring?” Being under the influence of  liquor, he was not on his guard; and he took my  brother by the hand, and led him to a trunk; then  opening it, he said; “there, sir, are the proceeds of  ’s gen sang <Ginseng>;” Showing him a vast amount  of Silver and gold.
My brother, at this, was much astounded;  however, he disguised his feelings; and talking  with him a short time on different subjects, that he  returned home; and that night about 10 o’clock  started for Randolph to see [illegible] of my .
Mr. Stevens, on overcoming his intoxication, began  to reflect upon what he had done; he immediately  made inquiry concerning my brother, and ascertaining that  he had gone to Randolph, and conjecturing his bus iness, namely, that he had gone to see res pecting the gen sang <Ginseng> adventure, went immediately to  his establishment, dismissed his hands, called his  carriage, and fled with his cash to Canada;  and I have never heard aught concerning him since.
My pursued him awhile, but finding  pursuit vain, returned home much dispirited at the [p. 44]
had been placed in his care to be delivered to him ()
In a short time afterwards, young Stevens hired a house of my brother Stephen, and employed eight or ten hands, and commenced the business of chrystalizing Ginseng. When he had got fairly at work, Stephen went to see him, and, as it happened, found him considerably intoxicated. My brother, on approaching him, spoke him him thus: “Well, Mr. Stevens, you are doing a fine business; you will soon be ready for another trip to China.” Then, in quite a careless and indifferent manner, observed again: “Oh, Mr. Stevens how much did ’s adventure bring?” Being under the influence of liquor, he was not on his guard; and he took my brother by the hand, and led him to a trunk; then opening it, he said; “there, sir, are the proceeds of ’s Ginseng;” Showing him a vast amount of Silver and gold.
My brother, at this, was much astounded; however, he disguised his feelings; and talking with him a short time on different subjects, he returned home; and that night about 10 o’clock started for Randolph to see my .
Mr. Stevens, on overcoming his intoxication, began to reflect upon what he had done; he immediately made inquiry concerning my brother, and ascertaining that he had gone to Randolph, and conjecturing his business, namely, that he had gone to see respecting the Ginseng adventure, went immediately to his establishment, dismissed his hands, called his carriage, and fled with his cash to Canada; and I have never heard aught concerning him since.
My pursued him awhile, but finding pursuit vain, returned home much dispirited at the [p. 44]
Page 44