Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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slowly, but surely resuscitate and revive till the pallid monster fled so far that the patient was left in the full bloom of vigorous health. But it God that hath done it, and to him let all the praise be given.
I am now compelled to close this epistle; for I must start immediately on a journey of more than 100 miles to attend a heavy case of sickness; so God be with you all; farewell.
Jason Mack
 
The next intelligence we received from Jason, was, that himself, his wife, and oldest son, were dead. <And> this concludes my account of brother Jason.
 
Chapter 13
Chap. 13.
 
The ’s dream
 
While we were living in the town of Tunbridge my mind became deeply impressed with the subject of religion; which probably was occasioned by my singular experience during my sickness at Randolph: I commenced attending Methodist meetings; and, in order to oblige me, my accompanied me for a few times; but, when this came to the ears of his father and oldest brother, they were highly displeased, and said so much concerning the matter, that he (my ) thought best to desist; and said, that he considered it as hardly worth our while to attend meetings my longer, as it would prove but little advantage to us; besides, this, it gave our friends such disagreeable [p. 48]
slowly, but surely resuscitate and revive till the pallid monster fled so far that the patient was left in the full bloom of vigorous health. But it God that hath done it, and to him let all the praise be given.
I am now compelled to close this epistle; for I must start immediately on a journey of more than 100 miles to attend a heavy case of sickness; so God be with you all; farewell.
Jason Mack
 
The next intelligence we received from Jason, was, that himself, wife, and oldest son, were dead. And this concludes my account of brother Jason.
 
Chapter 13
Chap. 13.
 
The ’s dream
 
While we were living in the town of Tunbridge my mind became deeply impressed with the subject of religion; which probably was occasioned by my singular experience during my sickness at Randolph: I commenced attending Methodist meetings; and, in order to oblige me, my accompanied me ; but, when this came to the ears of his oldest brother, they were highly displeased, and said so much concerning the matter, that he (my ) thought best to desist; and said, that he considered it as hardly worth our while to attend meetings my longer, as it would prove but little advantage to us; besides, , it gave our friends such disagreeable [p. 48]
Page 48