Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 62
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I went several hundred yards from the house, in  order to be out of hearing.
The surgion soon commenced opperation: he bored  first on one side of the bone, which was affected, then  on the other side: after which, he broke it off with  a pair of pincers; and in this manner, took away  large pieces of the bone.
On breaking off the first piece, Joseph screamed  out so loudly, that I could not forbear running to him.  When I entered his room he cried out: “Oh, ,  go back, go back; I do not want you to come  in— I will try to tough it out, if you will go  away.”
When the third fracture <piece> was taken away I burst  into the room again. And Oh my God! what  a spectacle for a mother’s eye! the wound torn  open, and the blood still gushing from it— and  the bed litterally covered with blood. Joseph  was as pale as a corpse, and large drops of sweat  were rolling down his face; whilst every feature the  utmost agony was depicted in every feature.
I was immediately forced from the room, and  detained until the opperation was completed.  When this was done, Joseph put on a clean bed,  then and the room cleared of every appearance of blood,  as well as the instruments removed which were used  on the accasion, I was allowed again to enter.  I now beheld him quiet, and, in a measure, free from  pain; although pale as a corpse from exhaustion  and loss of blood.
Joseph immediately commenced getting better; and  from this onward continued to mend, until he  became strong and healthy.
Having so far recovered as to be able to [p. 62]
I went several hundred yards from the house, in order to be out of hearing.
The surgion soon commenced opperation: he bored first on one side of the bone, which was affected, then on the other side: after which, he broke it off with a pair of pincers; and in this manner, took away large pieces of the bone.
On breaking off the first piece, Joseph screamed out so loudly, that I could not forbear running to him. When I entered his room he cried out: “Oh, , go back, go back; I do not want you to come in— I will try to tough it out, if you will go away.”
When the third piece was taken away I burst into the room again. And Oh my God! what a spectacle for a mother’s eye! the wound torn open, and the blood still gushing from it— and the bed litterally covered with blood. Joseph was as pale as a corpse, and large drops of sweat were rolling down his face; whilst the utmost agony was depicted in every feature.
I was immediately forced from the room, and detained until the opperation was completed. When this was done, Joseph put on a clean bed, and the room cleared of every appearance of blood, as well as the instruments removed which were used on the accasion, I was allowed again to enter. I now beheld him quiet, and, in a measure, free from pain; although pale as a corpse from exhaustion and loss of blood.
Joseph immediately commenced getting better; and from this onward continued to mend, until he became strong and healthy.
Having so far recovered as to be able to [p. 62]
Page 62