Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 64
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The second year the crops were as the year previous — a perfect failure. now determined to  plant once more; and, if he should have had no better  success, than he had had the two years previous,  he would go to the State of , where wheat  was raised in abundance. The next year an  untimely frost destroyed the crops; which, being the  third year in succession in which that the crops had fai led, almost caused a famine.
This was enough. My was now altogether  decided upon going to . He came  in one day in quite a thoughtful mood and sat  down. After meditating some time he observed,  “that, could he so arrange his affairs, he would  be glad to go start with one Mr. Howard for , who was going in a short time.; but, that he  could not leave consistently, as the situation of the  family would not admit of his absence; besides,  he was owing some, that must be first paid.” I told  him it was my opinion, he might get, both his creditors  and debtors together, and arrange matters between them  in such a way, as to give satisfaction to both par ties: and, in relation to the family, I thought I  could make every necessary preparation to follow, as  soon as he would be ready for us. So he called  upon all with whom he had any dealings and set tled up his accounts with them. But some of  his creditors, in the time of settlement, neglected to  bring forward their balancing account books, and they were  not balanced, or there were no entries made in them  to show settlement; but in cases of this kind he called  witnesses, that there might be evidence of the fact.
Having thus arranged his buisness, set [p. 64]
The second year the crops were as the year previous— a perfect failure. now determined to plant once more; and, if he had no better success, than he had the two years previous, he would go to the State of , where wheat was raised in abundance. The next year an untimely frost destroyed the crops; which, being the third year in succession that the crops had failed, almost caused a famine.
This was enough. My was now altogether decided upon going to . He came in one day in quite a thoughtful mood and sat down. After meditating some time he observed, “that, could he so arrange his affairs, he would be glad to start with one Mr. Howard for , who was going in a short time.; but, that he could not leave consistently, as the situation of the family would not admit of his absence; besides, he was owing some, that must be first paid.” I told him it was my opinion, he might get, his creditors and debtors together, and arrange matters between them in such a way, as to give satisfaction to both parties: and, in relation to the family, I thought I could make every necessary preparation to follow, as soon as he would be ready for us. So he called upon all with whom he had any dealings and settled up his accounts with them. But some of his creditors, in the time of settlement, neglected to bring forward their account books, and they were not balanced, or there were no entries made in them to show settlement; but in cases of this kind he called witnesses, that there might be evidence of the fact.
Having thus arranged his buisness, set [p. 64]
Page 64