Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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in the name of Jesus Christ, to forgive my sins. After this I felt considerably strengthened, and I began to amend. The porter then remarked, that it was necessary to plead the merits of Jesus, for he was the Advocate with the Father, and a Mediator between God and man. I was now made quite whole; and the door was opened; but on entering, I awoke.”
On the following spring we commenced making preparations to build us another house— one that would be more comfortable, for persons in advanced life.
 
Chapter 18
Chap. 18.
 
History of Joseph the Prophet commences7th vision of
 
I now come <to> the history of Joseph. By refference to the table you will find the date and place of his birth; besides this, and what has already been said, I shall say nothing respecting him until he arrived at the age of fourteen; yet I am aware that some of my readers, in this, will be disappointed; for, I am led to suppose, by questions which are frequently asked me, that it is thought by some, I will be likely to tell many very remarkable incidents, connected with his childhood; but, as nothing occurred during his early life, excepting those trivial circumstances which are common to that state of human existence, I pass them in silence. [p. 71]
in the name of Jesus Christ, to forgive my sins. After this I felt considerably strengthened, and I began to amend. The porter then remarked, that it was necessary to plead the merits of Jesus, for he was the Advocate with the Father, and a Mediator between God and man. I was now made quite whole; and the door was opened; but on entering, I awoke.”
On the following spring we commenced making preparations to build us another house— one that would be more comfortable, for persons in advanced life.
 
Chapter 18
Chap. 18.
 
History of Joseph the Prophet commences7th vision of
 
I now come to the history of Joseph. By refference to the table you will find the date and place of his birth; besides this, and what has already been said, I shall say nothing respecting him until he arrived at the age of fourteen; yet I am aware that some of my readers, in this, will be disappointed; for, I am led to suppose, by questions which are frequently asked me, that it is thought by some, I will be likely to tell many very remarkable incidents, connected with his childhood; but, as nothing occurred during his early life, excepting those trivial circumstances which are common to that state of human existence, I pass them in silence. [p. 71]
Page 71