Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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which time he enlisted in the services of his .
I have a sketch of my ’s life, written by himself,  in which is detailed an account of his several campaigns and  many of his advenures while in the army: From this I extract  the following.—
“At the age of 21 years, I left my master; shortly after which  I enlisted in the services of my , under the command of  Cap. Henry, and was annexed to the regiment commanded  by Col. Whiting.
“From we marched to Fort Edwards. We  were in a severe battle fought at Half-way brook in 1755.
“During this expedition I caught a heavy cold, which rend ered me unfit for business until the return of warm weather.  I was carried the ensuing spring (1756) to .
“In the year of 1757, I had two teams in the King’s service; which  were employed in carrying the Gen.’s baggage. While thus  engaged I went one morning as usual to yoke my team; but  three of my oxen were missing. When this came to the kno wledge of the officer he was very angry, and, drawing his  sword threatened to run it through me.
“He then ordered me to get three others; which I accordin gly did, and proceeded with <the> baggage to Fort Edwards,  and the next day returned in order to find my oxen.
“While I was performing this trip, the following circu mstance occured: about half way from Still-water  to Fort Edwards, I espied four Indians nearly 30 rods  distant coming out of the woods. They were armed with  scalping knives, tomahawks, and guns.— I was alone;  but about 20 rods behind me was a man by the name of  Webster— I saw my danger, and, that there was no way to  escape unless I could do it by stratagem. So I rushed  upon them, calling in the meantime at the top of my voice,  ‘rush on! rush on my boys! we’ll have the devils.’ The [p. 2]
which time he enlisted in the services of his .
I have a sketch of my ’s life, written by himself, in which is detailed an account of his several campaigns and many of his advenures while in the army: From this I extract the following.—
“At the age of 21 years, I left my master; shortly after which I enlisted in the services of my , under the command of Cap. Henry, and was annexed to the regiment commanded by Col. Whiting.
“From we marched to Fort Edwards. We were in a severe battle fought at Half-way brook in 1755.
“During this expedition I caught a heavy cold, which rendered me unfit for business until the return of warm weather. I was carried the ensuing spring (1756) to .
“In the year of 1757, I had two teams in the King’s service; which were employed in carrying the Gen.’s baggage. While thus engaged I went one morning as usual to yoke my team; but three of my oxen were missing. When this came to the knowledge of the officer he was very angry, and, drawing his sword threatened to run it through me.
“He then ordered me to get three others; which I accordingly did, and proceeded with the baggage to Fort Edwards, and the next day returned in order to find my oxen.
“While I was performing this trip, the following circumstance occured: about half way from Still-water to Fort Edwards, I espied four Indians nearly 30 rods distant coming out of the woods. They were armed with scalping knives, tomahawks, and guns.— I was alone; but about 20 rods behind me was a man by the name of Webster— I saw my danger, and, that there was no way to escape unless I could do it by stratagem. So I rushed upon them, calling in the meantime at the top of my voice, ‘rush on! rush on my boys! we’ll have the devils.’ The [p. 2]
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