Minute Book 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 169
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condition, for the want of food and fire-wood; the weather being very cold and stormy.— Much property was destroyed by the troops in town, during their stay there; such as burning houselogs, rails, corncribs, boards &c. the using of corn and hay, the plundering of houses; the killing of cattle, sheep and hogs, and also the taking off horses not their own; and all this without regard to owners; or asking leave of any one.—
In the meantime men were abused, women insulted and ravished by the troops; and all this, while we were kept prisonors.— Whilst the town was guarded, we were called together by the order of , and a guard placed close around us; and in that situation were compelled, to sign a deed of trust for the purpose of making our individual property all holden, as they said, to pay all the debts of every individual belonging to the Church, and also to pay for all damages, the old inhabitants of may have sustained, in consequence of the late difficulties in that County.—
was now arrived, and the first important move by him was the collecting our men together on the square and selecting out about 50 of them; whom he immediately marched unto a house and confined close, this was done, without the aid of the sheriff; or any legal process. The next day 46 of those taken, were driven like a parcel of menial slaves, off to , not knowing why they were taken; or what they were taken for. After being confined in more than 2 weeks, about one half were liberated the rest after another week’s confinement, were most of them recognized to appear at Court and have since been let to bail.— Since withdrew his troops from , parties of armed men have reconoitered the , driving off horses, sheep, and cattle, and also plundering houses.— The barbarity of ’ troops ought not to be passed over in silence, they shot down our
condition, for the want of food and fire-wood; the weather being very cold and stormy.— Much property was destroyed by the troops in town, during their stay there; such as burning houselogs, rails, corncribs, boards &c. the using of corn and hay, the plundering of houses; the killing of cattle, sheep and hogs, and also the taking off horses not their own; and all this without regard to owners; or asking leave of any one.—
In the meantime men were abused, women insulted and ravished by the troops; and all this, while we were kept prisonors.— Whilst the town was guarded, we were called together by the order of , and a guard placed close around us; and in that situation were compelled, to sign a deed of trust for the purpose of making our individual property all holden, as they said, to pay all the debts of every individual belonging to the Church, and also to pay for all damages, the old inhabitants of may have sustained, in consequence of the late difficulties in that County.—
was now arrived, and the first important move by him was the collecting our men together on the square and selecting out about 50 of them; whom he immediately marched unto a house and confined close, this was done, without the aid of the sheriff; or any legal process. The next day 46 of those taken, were driven like a parcel of menial slaves, off to , not knowing why they were taken; or what they were taken for. After being confined in more than 2 weeks, about one half were liberated the rest after another week’s confinement, were most of them recognized to appear at Court and have since been let to bail.— Since withdrew his troops from , parties of armed men have reconoitered the , driving off horses, sheep, and cattle, and also plundering houses.— The barbarity of ’ troops ought not to be passed over in silence, they shot down our
Page 169