Minute Book 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 171
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a standing in our Church of an earlier date than the  difficulties in . And when it is considered;  that, the rights of this people have been trampled upon from to  time with impunity, and abuses heaped upon them almost  innumerable; it ought in some degree, to paliate for any infrac tion of the Law which may have been made on the part of  any of our people.
The late order of to drive us from this  , or exterminate us, is a thing so novel, unlawful, tyranni cal and oppressive, that we have been induced to draw up  this memmorial and present this statement of our case to  your Honorable Body, praying that a law may be passed  resinding the order of the to drive us out of <from> the  ; and also giving us the sanction of the Legislature to  inherit our lands in peace we ask an expression of the  Legislature, disapprobating the conduct of those who compelled  us to sign a deed of trust and also disapproving of any man  or set of men, in taking our property in consequence of that  deed of trust, and appropriating it to the payment of debts not  contracted by us; or for the payment of damages sustained in  consequence of tresspasses committed by others.
We have no common stock, our property is indivi[d]ual  property, and we feel willing to pay our debts as other individ uals do; but we are not willing to be bound to pay other  people’s debts also.
The arms which were taken from us here, which  we understand to be about 630, besides swords and pistols we care  not so much about, as we do the pay for them; only we are  bound to do military duty, which we are willing to do, and  which we think was sufficiently manifested; by the raising  of a volunteer Company last fall at , when called  upon by to rais troops for the frontier.
The arms given up by us, we considered were worth  between twelve and fifteen thousand dollars; but we [p. 171]
a standing in our Church of an earlier date than the difficulties in . And when it is considered; that, the rights of this people have been trampled upon from to time with impunity, and abuses heaped upon them almost innumerable; it ought in some degree, to paliate for any infraction of the Law which may have been made on the part of any of our people.
The late order of to drive us from this , or exterminate us, is a thing so novel, unlawful, tyrannical and oppressive, that we have been induced to draw up this memmorial and present this statement of our case to your Honorable Body, praying that a law may be passed resinding the order of the to drive us from the ; and also giving us the sanction of the Legislature to inherit our lands in peace we ask an expression of the Legislature, disapprobating the conduct of those who compelled us to sign a deed of trust and also disapproving of any man or set of men, in taking our property in consequence of that deed of trust, and appropriating it to the payment of debts not contracted by us; or for the payment of damages sustained in consequence of tresspasses committed by others.
We have no common stock, our property is individual property, and we feel willing to pay our debts as other individuals do; but we are not willing to be bound to pay other people’s debts also.
The arms which were taken from us here, which we understand to be about 630, besides swords and pistols we care not so much about, as we do the pay for them; only we are bound to do military duty, which we are willing to do, and which we think was sufficiently manifested; by the raising of a volunteer Company last fall at , when called upon by to rais troops for the frontier.
The arms given up by us, we considered were worth between twelve and fifteen thousand dollars; but we [p. 171]
Page 171