“Pacific Innuendo,” 16–17 February 1844

  • Source Note
Page 442
PACIFIC INNUENDO.
The very candid, pacific, and highly creditable advice, which has done himself the honor to address to “the Citizens of , “Mormons and all,” and which appears in the “Warsaw Signal,” of the 14th inst. is, like the balm of Gilead, well calculated to ease the pain, which has troubled the heads and hearts of the Carthagenians, Warsawvains, and other over jealous bodies for weal and wo. It certainly must be admitted, on all hands, that has exalted himself as a mediator, patriot, lawyer, Governor, peace maker, and friend of all; not only to magnify the law and make it honorable, but also in pointing out the path of peace. Such is what the Latter Day Saints have ever sought at the hands of those in authority; and, with an approving conscience, clear as the chystal [crystal] spring: and with a laudible intention, warm as the summer zephyr; and with a charitable prayer, mellow as the morning dew, it is now our highest consolation to hope that all difficulties will cease: and give way to reason, sense, peace and good will. The saints if they will be humble and wise, can now practice what they preach and soften by good examples, rather than harden by a distant course of conduct, the hearts of the people.
For general information it may be well to say that there has never been any cause for alarm as to the Latter Day Saints. The legislature of granted a liberal charter for the city of ; and, let every honest man in the , who has any knowledge of her, say whether she has not flourished beyond the most sanguine anticipations of all; and while they witness her growing glory: let them solemnly testify whether has willfully injured the , , or a single individual one cent: With the strictest scrutiny publish the facts whether a particle of law has been evaded or broken: virtue and innocence need no artificial covering: Political views and party distinctions, never should disturb the harmony of society; and when the whole truth comes before a virtuous people: we are willing to abide the issue.
We will here refer to the three late dismissals, upon writs of habaes corpus, of Joseph Smith, when arrested under the requisitions of . The first, in June 1841, was tried at Monmouth, before , of the fifth Judicial Circuit, and as no exceptions have been taken to that decision, by this or , but had previously entered a nolle prosequi on all the old indictments against the Mormons in the difficulties of 1838, it is taken and granted that that decision was just! The second, in December, 1842, was tried at before in the U. S. Distric[t] Court, and, from that honorable discharge a[s] no exceptions from any source have been made to those proceedings, it follows as a matter o[f] course, that that decision was just!! and th[e] third, in July 1843, was tried at the city o[f] , before the Municipal Court of said city; and as no exceptions to that discharge have been taken, and as the say[s] there is “evidence on the other side to shew that the of voluntarily carried (who had Mr, Smith in custody,) to the city of , without any coercion on the part of any one,” it must be admitted that that decision was just!!!
But is any man still unconvinced of the justness of these strictures relative to the two la[st] cases, let the astounding fact go forth, tha[t] , who, swore, wa[s] the principal in his assassination, and, as acce[s] [p. 442]
PACIFIC INNUENDO.
The very candid, pacific, and highly creditable advice, which has done himself the honor to address to “the Citizens of , “Mormons and all,” and which appears in the “Warsaw Signal,” of the 14th inst. is, like the balm of Gilead, well calculated to ease the pain, which has troubled the heads and hearts of the Carthagenians, Warsawvains, and other over jealous bodies for weal and wo. It certainly must be admitted, on all hands, that has exalted himself as a mediator, patriot, lawyer, Governor, peace maker, and friend of all; not only to magnify the law and make it honorable, but also in pointing out the path of peace. Such is what the Latter Day Saints have ever sought at the hands of those in authority; and, with an approving conscience, clear as the chystal [crystal] spring: and with a laudible intention, warm as the summer zephyr; and with a charitable prayer, mellow as the morning dew, it is now our highest consolation to hope that all difficulties will cease: and give way to reason, sense, peace and good will. The saints if they will be humble and wise, can now practice what they preach and soften by good examples, rather than harden by a distant course of conduct, the hearts of the people.
For general information it may be well to say that there has never been any cause for alarm as to the Latter Day Saints. The legislature of granted a liberal charter for the city of ; and, let every honest man in the , who has any knowledge of her, say whether she has not flourished beyond the most sanguine anticipations of all; and while they witness her growing glory: let them solemnly testify whether has willfully injured the , , or a single individual one cent: With the strictest scrutiny publish the facts whether a particle of law has been evaded or broken: virtue and innocence need no artificial covering: Political views and party distinctions, never should disturb the harmony of society; and when the whole truth comes before a virtuous people: we are willing to abide the issue.
We will here refer to the three late dismissals, upon writs of habaes corpus, of Joseph Smith, when arrested under the requisitions of . The first, in June 1841, was tried at Monmouth, before , of the fifth Judicial Circuit, and as no exceptions have been taken to that decision, by this or , but had previously entered a nolle prosequi on all the old indictments against the Mormons in the difficulties of 1838, it is taken and granted that that decision was just! The second, in December, 1842, was tried at before in the U. S. District Court, and, from that honorable discharge as no exceptions from any source have been made to those proceedings, it follows as a matter of course, that that decision was just!! and the third, in July 1843, was tried at the city of , before the Municipal Court of said city; and as no exceptions to that discharge have been taken, and as the says there is “evidence on the other side to shew that the of voluntarily carried (who had Mr, Smith in custody,) to the city of , without any coercion on the part of any one,” it must be admitted that that decision was just!!!
But is any man still unconvinced of the justness of these strictures relative to the two last cases, let the astounding fact go forth, that , who, swore, was the principal in his assassination, and, as acces [p. 442]
Page 442