Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the removal from the state of all free negroes and mu lattoes? (except certain priviledged ones;) and also  for the punishment of those who introduce or harbor  them? The statement concerning our invitation to  them to become Mormons, and remove to this state,  and settle among us, is a wicked fabrication, as no  such thing was ever published in the Star, or any  where else, by our people nor any thing in the sha dow of it; and we challenge the people of ,  or any other people, to produce such a publication  from us.
In fact, one half dozen negroes or mulattoes, never  have belonged to our Society, in any part of the  world, from its first organization to this day, 1839.
5thly, As to crime or vice, we solemly appeal to all  the records of the courts of , and chal lenge the county to produce the name of any individ ual of our Society on the list of indictments, from the  time of our first settlement in the , to the time  of our expulsion, a period of more than two years.
6thly, As it respects the ridiculous report of our  threatening that we would have their lands for a pos session, it is too simple to require a notice, as the laws  of the guarantee to every man his rights, and  abundantly protect him in their full enjoyment. And  we hereby declare, that we settled no lands, only such  as our money purchased, and that no such thing ever  entered our hearts, as possessing any inheritance in  any other way. And
7thly, We ask what public morals were in danger  of being corrupted, where officers of the peace could  openly violate their several oaths in the most awful  manner, and join with hundreds of others in murder,  treason, robbery, house burning, stealing, etc.
But to proceed with my history. Pursuant to the  last clause of the bond, the mob met at the , on the 20th of July, and proceeded immedi ately to demolish the brick and dwel [p. 11]
the removal from the state of all free negroes and mulattoes? (except certain priviledged ones;) and also for the punishment of those who introduce or harbor them? The statement concerning our invitation to them to become Mormons, and remove to this state, and settle among us, is a wicked fabrication, as no such thing was ever published in the Star, or any where else, by our people nor any thing in the shadow of it; and we challenge the people of , or any other people, to produce such a publication from us.
In fact, one half dozen negroes or mulattoes, never have belonged to our Society, in any part of the world, from its first organization to this day, 1839.
5thly, As to crime or vice, we solemly appeal to all the records of the courts of , and challenge the county to produce the name of any individual of our Society on the list of indictments, from the time of our first settlement in the , to the time of our expulsion, a period of more than two years.
6thly, As it respects the ridiculous report of our threatening that we would have their lands for a possession, it is too simple to require a notice, as the laws of the guarantee to every man his rights, and abundantly protect him in their full enjoyment. And we hereby declare, that we settled no lands, only such as our money purchased, and that no such thing ever entered our hearts, as possessing any inheritance in any other way. And
7thly, We ask what public morals were in danger of being corrupted, where officers of the peace could openly violate their several oaths in the most awful manner, and join with hundreds of others in murder, treason, robbery, house burning, stealing, etc.
But to proceed with my history. Pursuant to the last clause of the bond, the mob met at the , on the 20th of July, and proceeded immediately to demolish the brick and dwel [p. 11]
Page 11