Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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broke away and became some lighter, and then we  were enabled to go on; but the rain began to fall in  torrents, and continued all the latter part of the night;  we soon became completely drenched, and every  thread about us perfectly wet; but still we dare not  stop for any refreshment or shelter until day dawned,  when we found ourselves forty miles from home, and  at the door of a friend, where we breakfasted and re freshed ourselves.
We then repaired to Lexington and made oath, be fore , of the outrages committed upon  us, but were refused a warrant; the advising  us to fight and kill the mob whenever they came upon  us. We then returned to the place where we break fasted; and, night coming on, we retired to bed.—  Having been without sleep for the three previous  nights, and much of the time drenched in rain, to gether with the severe wound I had received, I was  well nigh exhausted. No sooner had sleep enfolded  me in her kind embrace, than a vision opened before  me:
I found myself in , heard the roar of  fire-arms, and saw the killed and wounded lying in  their blood. At this I awoke from my slumber; and  awaking and the family with whom we  tarried, I told them what I had seen and heard in my  dream, and observed to them that I was sure that a  battle had just ensued. Next morning we arose and  pursued our journey homeward, with feelings of anx iety and amazement which cannot be described.
Every officer of the peace had abandoned us to our  fate, and it seemed as if there was no way but for men,  women and children to be exterminated. But as we  rode on, ruminating upon these things, a man met us,  from , who told us that there was a bat tle raging when he left, and how it had terminated he  knew not.
This only heightened our feelings of anxiety and [p. 16]
broke away and became some lighter, and then we were enabled to go on; but the rain began to fall in torrents, and continued all the latter part of the night; we soon became completely drenched, and every thread about us perfectly wet; but still we dare not stop for any refreshment or shelter until day dawned, when we found ourselves forty miles from home, and at the door of a friend, where we breakfasted and refreshed ourselves.
We then repaired to Lexington and made oath, before , of the outrages committed upon us, but were refused a warrant; the advising us to fight and kill the mob whenever they came upon us. We then returned to the place where we breakfasted; and, night coming on, we retired to bed.— Having been without sleep for the three previous nights, and much of the time drenched in rain, together with the severe wound I had received, I was well nigh exhausted. No sooner had sleep enfolded me in her kind embrace, than a vision opened before me:
I found myself in , heard the roar of fire-arms, and saw the killed and wounded lying in their blood. At this I awoke from my slumber; and awaking and the family with whom we tarried, I told them what I had seen and heard in my dream, and observed to them that I was sure that a battle had just ensued. Next morning we arose and pursued our journey homeward, with feelings of anxiety and amazement which cannot be described.
Every officer of the peace had abandoned us to our fate, and it seemed as if there was no way but for men, women and children to be exterminated. But as we rode on, ruminating upon these things, a man met us, from , who told us that there was a battle raging when he left, and how it had terminated he knew not.
This only heightened our feelings of anxiety and [p. 16]
Page 16