Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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This man concealed me in his waggon, and thus  we passed in safety, although frequently meeting  armed men, who were pursuing our brethren. When  night again overtook us, we were on the bank of the  , which divided between and   counties. Here we encamped for the night, as  we could not cross the ferry till morning. I left the  camp and ascended the tall bluff, and finding a cavity  of a rock, I slept therein. But before morning, I was  joined by and several others, who fled for  their lives, and brought news that the mob were dri ving, and probably butchering men, women and chil dren. On hearing this news, we tried to pray, but  we could say but little. Next morning we crossed  over the river, and found ourselves once more in a  land of peace. While I thus made my escape, com panies of ruffians were ranging the in every  direction, bursting into houses without fear, knowing  that the arms were secured, frightening women and  children, and threatening to kill them if they didn’t  flee immediately. At the head of one of these com panies appeared the , (a noted Mis sionary to the Indians) with a gun upon his shoulder,  ordering the Mormons to leave immediately, and sur render every thing in the shape of arms. Other pre tended preachers of the Gospel took part in the per secution; calling the Mormons the common enemy of  mankind, and exulting in their afflictions. On Tues day and Wednesday nights, the 5th and 6th of No vember, women and children fled in every direction,  before a merciless mob. One party of about a hun dred and fifty women and children, fled to the prai rie, where they wandered for several days, mostly  without food, and nothing but the open firmament for  their shelter. Other parties fled towards the .  During this dispersion of women and children, par ties of the mob were hunting men, firing upon some,  tying up and whipping others; and some they pursu ed upon horses for several miles. [p. 21]
This man concealed me in his waggon, and thus we passed in safety, although frequently meeting armed men, who were pursuing our brethren. When night again overtook us, we were on the bank of the , which divided between and counties. Here we encamped for the night, as we could not cross the ferry till morning. I left the camp and ascended the tall bluff, and finding a cavity of a rock, I slept therein. But before morning, I was joined by and several others, who fled for their lives, and brought news that the mob were driving, and probably butchering men, women and children. On hearing this news, we tried to pray, but we could say but little. Next morning we crossed over the river, and found ourselves once more in a land of peace. While I thus made my escape, companies of ruffians were ranging the in every direction, bursting into houses without fear, knowing that the arms were secured, frightening women and children, and threatening to kill them if they didn’t flee immediately. At the head of one of these companies appeared the , (a noted Missionary to the Indians) with a gun upon his shoulder, ordering the Mormons to leave immediately, and surrender every thing in the shape of arms. Other pretended preachers of the Gospel took part in the persecution; calling the Mormons the common enemy of mankind, and exulting in their afflictions. On Tuesday and Wednesday nights, the 5th and 6th of November, women and children fled in every direction, before a merciless mob. One party of about a hundred and fifty women and children, fled to the prairie, where they wandered for several days, mostly without food, and nothing but the open firmament for their shelter. Other parties fled towards the . During this dispersion of women and children, parties of the mob were hunting men, firing upon some, tying up and whipping others; and some they pursued upon horses for several miles. [p. 21]
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