Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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, the robbers undertook to drive our people  from the poll box, and threatened to kill whoever  should attempt to vote. But some were determined  to enjoy their right or die; they therefore went for ward to vote, but were seized by the opposing party  and attacked, and thus a fight commenced. But  some of our people knocked down several of the rob bers, and thus cleared the ground and maintained  their rights, though vastly unequal in numbers. The  news of this affair soon spread far and wide, and  caused the people to rally, some for liberty and some  to support the robbers in their daring outrages. About  one hundred and fifty of those who were on the side  of liberty, marched to the spot next day, and went  to the residence of the leaders in this outrage, and  soon an agreement was signed for peace. But this  was of short duration, for the conspirators were stir red up throughout the whole , being alarmed for  fear the Mormons, as they called them, should be come so formidable as to maintain their rights and  liberties, insomuch that they could no more drive and  plunder them. About this time, meetings were held  by the robbers in Carroll, Saline, and other counties,  in which they openly declared their treasonable and  murderous intentions of driving the citizens who be longed to our society from their counties, and if pos sible, from the . Resolutions to this effect were  published in the journals of Upper , and this  without a single remark of disapprobation. Nay  more, this murderous gang when assembled and paint ed like Indian warriors, and when openly committing  murder, robbery, and house burning, were denomina ted citizens, white people, &c., in most of the pa pers of the , while our society who stood firm  in the cause of liberty and law, were denominated  Mormons, in contradistinction to the appelation of citi zens, whites, &c, as if we had been some savage  tribe, or some colored race of foreigners. The rob [p. 28]
, the robbers undertook to drive our people from the poll box, and threatened to kill whoever should attempt to vote. But some were determined to enjoy their right or die; they therefore went forward to vote, but were seized by the opposing party and attacked, and thus a fight commenced. But some of our people knocked down several of the robbers, and thus cleared the ground and maintained their rights, though vastly unequal in numbers. The news of this affair soon spread far and wide, and caused the people to rally, some for liberty and some to support the robbers in their daring outrages. About one hundred and fifty of those who were on the side of liberty, marched to the spot next day, and went to the residence of the leaders in this outrage, and soon an agreement was signed for peace. But this was of short duration, for the conspirators were stirred up throughout the whole , being alarmed for fear the Mormons, as they called them, should become so formidable as to maintain their rights and liberties, insomuch that they could no more drive and plunder them. About this time, meetings were held by the robbers in Carroll, Saline, and other counties, in which they openly declared their treasonable and murderous intentions of driving the citizens who belonged to our society from their counties, and if possible, from the . Resolutions to this effect were published in the journals of Upper , and this without a single remark of disapprobation. Nay more, this murderous gang when assembled and painted like Indian warriors, and when openly committing murder, robbery, and house burning, were denominated citizens, white people, &c., in most of the papers of the , while our society who stood firm in the cause of liberty and law, were denominated Mormons, in contradistinction to the appelation of citizens, whites, &c, as if we had been some savage tribe, or some colored race of foreigners. The rob [p. 28]
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