Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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bers soon assembled, to the number of several hun dred, under arms, and rendezvoused in , being composed of individuals from many of  the counties around. Here they commenced firing  upon our citizens, and taking prisoners. Our people  made no resistence, except to assemble on their own  ground for defence. They also made oath before the  Circuit Judge, , to the above outrages.—  One thousand men were then ordered into service,  under the command of , and  Brigadier Generals and . These  were soon mustered and marched through ,  and took their stand in , where most of  them remained thirty days. The robbers were some what awed by these prompt measures, so that they  did not proceed farther at that time in , but  they proceeded to , a small town in Carroll  county, which was mostly settled by our people.—  Here they laid siege for several days, and subsisted  by plunder and robbery, watching every opportunity  to fire upon our citizens. At this time they had one  field piece, and were headed by a Presbyterian priest  by the name of , who, it is said, tended  prayer, night and morning, at the head of the gang.  In this siege they say that they killed a number of our  people. They also turned one and  his wife and children out of doors when sick, and set  fire to their house, and burned it to ashes before their  eyes. At length they succeeded in driving every  citizen from the place, to the sacrifice of every thing  which they could not take with them.
This event happened during a cold, bad spell of  weather, in October, and as many of the citizens  were sickly, and worn down by fatigue and war, and  robbed of shelter and of every thing comfortable,  they came near perishing; some of them did perish  before they arrived in , a distance of some  sixty miles. Here they were hospitably taken in by [p. 29]
bers soon assembled, to the number of several hundred, under arms, and rendezvoused in , being composed of individuals from many of the counties around. Here they commenced firing upon our citizens, and taking prisoners. Our people made no resistence, except to assemble on their own ground for defence. They also made oath before the Circuit Judge, , to the above outrages.— One thousand men were then ordered into service, under the command of , and Brigadier Generals and . These were soon mustered and marched through , and took their stand in , where most of them remained thirty days. The robbers were somewhat awed by these prompt measures, so that they did not proceed farther at that time in , but they proceeded to , a small town in Carroll county, which was mostly settled by our people.— Here they laid siege for several days, and subsisted by plunder and robbery, watching every opportunity to fire upon our citizens. At this time they had one field piece, and were headed by a Presbyterian priest by the name of , who, it is said, tended prayer, night and morning, at the head of the gang. In this siege they say that they killed a number of our people. They also turned one and his wife and children out of doors when sick, and set fire to their house, and burned it to ashes before their eyes. At length they succeeded in driving every citizen from the place, to the sacrifice of every thing which they could not take with them.
This event happened during a cold, bad spell of weather, in October, and as many of the citizens were sickly, and worn down by fatigue and war, and robbed of shelter and of every thing comfortable, they came near perishing; some of them did perish before they arrived in , a distance of some sixty miles. Here they were hospitably taken in by [p. 29]
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