Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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their brethren. Even two or three families often  crowded into one small house. The militia under   made some show of trying to prevent  these outrages, but at length informed  our people that his forces were so small, and many  of them so much in favor of the rebellion, that it was  useless to look any longer to them for protection.—  Several messages were also sent to the , but  he was utterly deaf to every thing which called for  the protection of our society, or any of the citizens  who belonged to it. But on the contrary, he heark ened to the insinuations of the robbers; and actually  presumed to give orders for the raising of several  thousand volunteers from the middle counties of the  , to march against the Mormons, as he termed  them. This force was soon on their march with the   at their head; but when he had come near  the Upper Country, he was officially notified that the  Mormons were not in a state of insurrection, but were  misrepresented by the robbers. His then  disbanded his forces and sneaked back to Jefferson  City to wait till the robbers should drive the Mor mons to some act which might be considered illegal,  which would give him some pretext for driving them  from the .
After the evacuation of , when our people  were officially notified that they must protect them selves, and expect no more protection from any de partment of the Government, they assembled  in the city of , to the number of near one  thousand men, and resolved to defend their rights to  the last; calling upon every person who could bear  arms to come forward in the support of our houses,  our homes, our wives and children, and the cause of  our and our God. In the mean time the rob bers elated with success, and emboldened by the  negligence of every department of the Govern ment, were increasing in numbers daily, and were on [p. 30]
their brethren. Even two or three families often crowded into one small house. The militia under made some show of trying to prevent these outrages, but at length informed our people that his forces were so small, and many of them so much in favor of the rebellion, that it was useless to look any longer to them for protection.— Several messages were also sent to the , but he was utterly deaf to every thing which called for the protection of our society, or any of the citizens who belonged to it. But on the contrary, he hearkened to the insinuations of the robbers; and actually presumed to give orders for the raising of several thousand volunteers from the middle counties of the , to march against the Mormons, as he termed them. This force was soon on their march with the at their head; but when he had come near the Upper Country, he was officially notified that the Mormons were not in a state of insurrection, but were misrepresented by the robbers. His then disbanded his forces and sneaked back to Jefferson City to wait till the robbers should drive the Mormons to some act which might be considered illegal, which would give him some pretext for driving them from the .
After the evacuation of , when our people were officially notified that they must protect themselves, and expect no more protection from any department of the Government, they assembled in the city of , to the number of near one thousand men, and resolved to defend their rights to the last; calling upon every person who could bear arms to come forward in the support of our houses, our homes, our wives and children, and the cause of our and our God. In the mean time the robbers elated with success, and emboldened by the negligence of every department of the Government, were increasing in numbers daily, and were on [p. 30]
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