Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 31
image
their march for , with their artillery and military stores, declaring that they would now drive the citizens from and from counties, which were settled mostly by our people.— In this march they took a number of the citizens prisoners, among whom was , a minister of the Gospel, and an excellent citizen of . They kept him a number of days, while his wife and children mourned his absence, and they held frequent consultations to kill him, but at length he was set at liberty. Our forces assembled in to the number of several hundred, to protect their homes; and at length a detachment of about one hundred men, under the command of Col. , met the robbers, and took from them their artillery, which consisted of one six pounder, and some powder and balls also, were taken from the enemy. All this was done without bloodshed, as the robbers buried their cannon in the earth and fled at the first news of the approach of our army. While the army were busily engaged in searching the camp of the robbers to find their field piece, a young lad saw some swine rooting in the middle of the highway, and he at length discovered some projecting part of the cannon, which had been uncovered by the swine, and he exclaimed, “here is the cannon.” At this, the soldiers gathered round, and soon raised the monster from its untimely grave. It was taken in triumph to the city of , and there on the heights of , amid rejoicing thousands, it uttered its voice in favor of liberty and law, and told the sad tale of some twenty miles around, that the robbers had lost their God of war, notwithstanding the pious prayers of priest . On another occasion the Robbers were transporting a waggon load of arms and ammunition from to , through , but in they providentially broke the[i]r waggon. In the mean time our sheriff got wind of the movements,
their march for , with their artillery and military stores, declaring that they would now drive the citizens from and from counties, which were settled mostly by our people.— In this march they took a number of the citizens prisoners, among whom was , a minister of the Gospel, and an excellent citizen of . They kept him a number of days, while his wife and children mourned his absence, and they held frequent consultations to kill him, but at length he was set at liberty. Our forces assembled in to the number of several hundred, to protect their homes; and at length a detachment of about one hundred men, under the command of Col. , met the robbers, and took from them their artillery, which consisted of one six pounder, and some powder and balls also, were taken from the enemy. All this was done without bloodshed, as the robbers buried their cannon in the earth and fled at the first news of the approach of our army. While the army were busily engaged in searching the camp of the robbers to find their field piece, a young lad saw some swine rooting in the middle of the highway, and he at length discovered some projecting part of the cannon, which had been uncovered by the swine, and he exclaimed, “here is the cannon.” At this, the soldiers gathered round, and soon raised the monster from its untimely grave. It was taken in triumph to the city of , and there on the heights of , amid rejoicing thousands, it uttered its voice in favor of liberty and law, and told the sad tale of some twenty miles around, that the robbers had lost their God of war, notwithstanding the pious prayers of priest . On another occasion the Robbers were transporting a waggon load of arms and ammunition from to , through , but in they providentially broke their waggon. In the mean time our sheriff got wind of the movements,
Page 31