Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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and went with a company of militia, and  took the arms and ammunition and brought them in  triumph to the city of , where they helped  to arm the patriotic citizens for defence. About the  time of the taking of the cannon, a small party of our  men, under the command of the brave Lieut. B.  went out through among those who pre tended great friendship for the laws, but were secret ly aiding the robbers. This party pretended to be  men from the Platt who had come down to assist the  robbers against the citizens, or Mormons as they were  called. Under this disguise their horses and them selves were fed free of cost, and welcomed every  where to all they could eat and drink, and many fur nished them rifles, and ammunition, together with  coats, blankets, &c., wishing them success. Some times they would offer to pay for their entertainment,  but their zealous hosts refused to take pay, and wish ed that their horses could eat a thousand bushels of  grain, for they were more than welcome.
In this way our troops were supplied with consid erable armament, and their secret enemies were dis covered and detected in their wicked plottings. Du ring this time the robbers were busily engaged in  burning and plundering houses, and driving women  and children from their homes, to perish with hunger  and cold, while they were robbed of every thing they  possessed, and their houses burned to ashes. Hun dreds were thus compelled to flee to the cities and  strongholds; women and children came in by night  and by day; and some of them in the midst of a tre mendous snow storm, in which they came near per ishing; but those who fled were kindly received into  the houses of their brethren, and thus their lives were  spared, but only to witness a more dreadful scene at  hand. It is said that some of our troops, exasperated  to the highest degree, retalliated in some instances by  plundering and burning houses, and bringing the [p. 32]
and went with a company of militia, and took the arms and ammunition and brought them in triumph to the city of , where they helped to arm the patriotic citizens for defence. About the time of the taking of the cannon, a small party of our men, under the command of the brave Lieut. B. went out through among those who pretended great friendship for the laws, but were secretly aiding the robbers. This party pretended to be men from the Platt who had come down to assist the robbers against the citizens, or Mormons as they were called. Under this disguise their horses and themselves were fed free of cost, and welcomed every where to all they could eat and drink, and many furnished them rifles, and ammunition, together with coats, blankets, &c., wishing them success. Sometimes they would offer to pay for their entertainment, but their zealous hosts refused to take pay, and wished that their horses could eat a thousand bushels of grain, for they were more than welcome.
In this way our troops were supplied with considerable armament, and their secret enemies were discovered and detected in their wicked plottings. During this time the robbers were busily engaged in burning and plundering houses, and driving women and children from their homes, to perish with hunger and cold, while they were robbed of every thing they possessed, and their houses burned to ashes. Hundreds were thus compelled to flee to the cities and strongholds; women and children came in by night and by day; and some of them in the midst of a tremendous snow storm, in which they came near perishing; but those who fled were kindly received into the houses of their brethren, and thus their lives were spared, but only to witness a more dreadful scene at hand. It is said that some of our troops, exasperated to the highest degree, retalliated in some instances by plundering and burning houses, and bringing the [p. 32]
Page 32