Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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spoil to feed the hungry and clothe the naked, whose  provisions and clothing had been robbed from them;  and upon the whole, I am rather inclined to believe  it was the case; for human nature cannot endure all  things.
Soon after these things had transpired in , was threatened from every quarter;  and her citizens assembled in , many of  them moving their wives and children, goods, provi sions, and even houses into the city; leaving their  lands desolate, in order that they might be embodied  and prepared to defend themselves and families to  the last. Our and his other commissioned  officers, had the troops paraded night and morning on  the public square, and ordered them to be always  ready in case of alarm. When we were dismissed  at eve, we were ordered to sleep in our clothes, and  be ready at a moments warning to run together at any  hour of the night. During this state of alarm, the  drum was beat, and guns fired, one night, about mid night. I ran to the , where many had  already collected together, and the news was that the  south part of our , adjoining , was attack ed by a mob, who were plundering houses, threaten ing women and children, and taking peaceable citi zens prisoners; and telling families to be gone by the  next morning or they would burn their houses over  their heads. With this information,  (to whom had committed the command  of the troops in , when he himself was not  present) sent out a detachment under the command  of Captain Durphey, aided by the brave . This company, consisting of about sixty men,  was sent to see what the matter was on the lines; and  who was committing depredations, and if necessary,  to protect or move in the families and property; and  if possible, effect the release of the prisoners.
This company was soon under way, having to ride [p. 33]
spoil to feed the hungry and clothe the naked, whose provisions and clothing had been robbed from them; and upon the whole, I am rather inclined to believe it was the case; for human nature cannot endure all things.
Soon after these things had transpired in , was threatened from every quarter; and her citizens assembled in , many of them moving their wives and children, goods, provisions, and even houses into the city; leaving their lands desolate, in order that they might be embodied and prepared to defend themselves and families to the last. Our and his other commissioned officers, had the troops paraded night and morning on the public square, and ordered them to be always ready in case of alarm. When we were dismissed at eve, we were ordered to sleep in our clothes, and be ready at a moments warning to run together at any hour of the night. During this state of alarm, the drum was beat, and guns fired, one night, about midnight. I ran to the , where many had already collected together, and the news was that the south part of our , adjoining , was attacked by a mob, who were plundering houses, threatening women and children, and taking peaceable citizens prisoners; and telling families to be gone by the next morning or they would burn their houses over their heads. With this information, (to whom had committed the command of the troops in , when he himself was not present) sent out a detachment under the command of Captain Durphey, aided by the brave . This company, consisting of about sixty men, was sent to see what the matter was on the lines; and who was committing depredations, and if necessary, to protect or move in the families and property; and if possible, effect the release of the prisoners.
This company was soon under way, having to ride [p. 33]
Page 33