Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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who was left dead on the ground; his name was  . The enemy had one killed and four  wounded, as we afterwards learned. We ascertain ed from the prisoners whom we had rescued, and one  whom we had taken, that the enemy consisted of one   and his company, who together with  some volunteers from different neighborhoods, mount ed about 60 men. Our party engaged, was from for ty to fifty in number, at the time of the engagement.  There were three of our fellow citizens prisoners in  their camp. Two of these ran away and escaped at  the commencement of the firing, and the other was  shot through the body in trying to run to our lines,  but fortunately he recovered, and is now a witness  against them.
Having now arranged every thing to the best ad vantage for the wounded, we moved on slowly to wards . When we came within fiive miles  of the city, our express had reached there with the  news of the battle, and we were met by a surgeon and  others for our relief, and among others the wife of the  pale and dying .
Our wounded were now taken into a house, and their  wounds dressed; and as Mrs. Patten entered the room  and cast her eyes on the pale and ghastly features of her  husband, she burst into tears, exclaiming O God! O my  husband! how pale you look! He was still able to  speak, but he died that evening in the triumphs of faith;  having laid down his life as a martyr in the cause of his   and his God. The young , who was  shot through the body by the first fire of the enemy’s  sentinel, also died about the same time. Thus three  brave men had fallen; and their blood cries against their  enemies for vengeance. The others I believe recover ed of their wounds. Having conveyed the wounded to  this place of hospitality, we hastened home to ,  and delivered the horses and spoils of the enemy to , the commanding officer of the Regiment. These  several defeats of the mob in and , [p. 36]
who was left dead on the ground; his name was . The enemy had one killed and four wounded, as we afterwards learned. We ascertained from the prisoners whom we had rescued, and one whom we had taken, that the enemy consisted of one and his company, who together with some volunteers from different neighborhoods, mounted about 60 men. Our party engaged, was from forty to fifty in number, at the time of the engagement. There were three of our fellow citizens prisoners in their camp. Two of these ran away and escaped at the commencement of the firing, and the other was shot through the body in trying to run to our lines, but fortunately he recovered, and is now a witness against them.
Having now arranged every thing to the best advantage for the wounded, we moved on slowly towards . When we came within fiive miles of the city, our express had reached there with the news of the battle, and we were met by a surgeon and others for our relief, and among others the wife of the pale and dying .
Our wounded were now taken into a house, and their wounds dressed; and as Mrs. Patten entered the room and cast her eyes on the pale and ghastly features of her husband, she burst into tears, exclaiming O God! O my husband! how pale you look! He was still able to speak, but he died that evening in the triumphs of faith; having laid down his life as a martyr in the cause of his and his God. The young , who was shot through the body by the first fire of the enemy’s sentinel, also died about the same time. Thus three brave men had fallen; and their blood cries against their enemies for vengeance. The others I believe recovered of their wounds. Having conveyed the wounded to this place of hospitality, we hastened home to , and delivered the horses and spoils of the enemy to , the commanding officer of the Regiment. These several defeats of the mob in and , [p. 36]
Page 36