Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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persons out of the city before they massacred the rest.—  This was a very alarming and unexpected answer. But  they were soon prevailed upon to suspend hostilities till  morning, when we were in hopes of some further and  more satisfactory information. The hostile army under  the command of , then commenced their encamp ment for the night, and our little army continued to stand  to their arms for fear of some treachery. Our company  of a hundred and fifty soon returned, informing us that  they had been hemmed in through the day, and only es caped from their superior knowledge of the ground.—  We also sent an express to , and by  morning were reinforced by quite a number of troops,  with at their head. In the mean time,  the painted robbers and murderers under the command  of one , came pouring in from the west, to strength en the enemy, and another company of murderers came  in from Carrel [Carroll] county, and were taken into the ranks of  , after murdering some twenty of our citizens at  Haun’s [Hawn’s] mill, of which I will give a particular account here after. Thus both parties were considerably reinforced  during the night. In the mean time our people, being  determined, if attacked, to defend their homes, and wives  and children to the last, spent the night in throwing up a  temporary breastwork of building timber, logs, rails, &c.,  and by morning our south side of the was fortified  with a breastwork, and also a considerable part of the  east and west sides; the whole line of fortification extend ing a mile and a half. This nights labor may seem in credible; but it happened that a great quantity of build ing materials had been accumulated near the spot where  were thrown up the breastworks: and this proved an  excellent material for the work. The next day, towards  evening, we were informed that the had order ed this force against us, with orders to exterminate us or  drive us from the . As soon as these facts were  ascertained, we determined not to resist any thing in the  shape of authority, however tyrannical or unconstitution al might be the proceedings against us; therefore we  had nothing more to do but to submit to be massacred or [p. 39]
persons out of the city before they massacred the rest.— This was a very alarming and unexpected answer. But they were soon prevailed upon to suspend hostilities till morning, when we were in hopes of some further and more satisfactory information. The hostile army under the command of , then commenced their encampment for the night, and our little army continued to stand to their arms for fear of some treachery. Our company of a hundred and fifty soon returned, informing us that they had been hemmed in through the day, and only escaped from their superior knowledge of the ground.— We also sent an express to , and by morning were reinforced by quite a number of troops, with at their head. In the mean time, the painted robbers and murderers under the command of one , came pouring in from the west, to strengthen the enemy, and another company of murderers came in from Carrel [Carroll] county, and were taken into the ranks of , after murdering some twenty of our citizens at Haun’s Hawn’s mill, of which I will give a particular account hereafter. Thus both parties were considerably reinforced during the night. In the mean time our people, being determined, if attacked, to defend their homes, and wives and children to the last, spent the night in throwing up a temporary breastwork of building timber, logs, rails, &c., and by morning our south side of the was fortified with a breastwork, and also a considerable part of the east and west sides; the whole line of fortification extending a mile and a half. This nights labor may seem incredible; but it happened that a great quantity of building materials had been accumulated near the spot where were thrown up the breastworks: and this proved an excellent material for the work. The next day, towards evening, we were informed that the had ordered this force against us, with orders to exterminate us or drive us from the . As soon as these facts were ascertained, we determined not to resist any thing in the shape of authority, however tyrannical or unconstitutional might be the proceedings against us; therefore we had nothing more to do but to submit to be massacred or [p. 39]
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