Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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keeper being appointed merely to look to us; with  him we walked out of town and visited the desolate  lands which belonged to our Society, and the place  which, seven years before, we had dedicated and  consecrated for the building of a , it being a  beautiful rise of ground, about half a mile west of . When we saw it last it was a wilder ness, but now our enemies had robbed it of every stick  of timber, and it presented a beautiful rolling field of  pasture, being covered with grass. Oh, how many  feelings did this spot awaken in our bosoms! Here  we had often bowed the knee in prayer to Jehovah  in by-gone years; and here we had assembled with  hundreds of happy saints, in the solemn meeting, and  offered our prayers, and songs, and sacraments, in  our humble dwellings; but now all was solemn and  lonely desolation; not a vestage remained to mark  the place where stood our former dwellings; they had  long since been consumed by fire, or removed to the  village and converted to the use of our enemies.  While at we were once or twice invi ted to dine with , and others, which we  did, with much apparent politeness and attention on  their part, and much cheerfulness and good felling on  our own.
After about a week spent in this way, during which  I was at one time alone in the wilderness, more than  a mile from , we were at length (after repeated  demands) sent to , at . This  place was on the same side of that  was, and about thirty miles distant. Generals  and had tried in vain to get a guard to ac company us; none would volunteer, and when draft ed, they would not obey orders; for, in truth, they  wished us to go at liberty. At last a colonel and two  or three officers started with us, with their swords  and pistols, which was more to protect us than to  keep us from escaping. On this journey some of us [p. 47]
keeper being appointed merely to look to us; with him we walked out of town and visited the desolate lands which belonged to our Society, and the place which, seven years before, we had dedicated and consecrated for the building of a , it being a beautiful rise of ground, about half a mile west of . When we saw it last it was a wilderness, but now our enemies had robbed it of every stick of timber, and it presented a beautiful rolling field of pasture, being covered with grass. Oh, how many feelings did this spot awaken in our bosoms! Here we had often bowed the knee in prayer to Jehovah in by-gone years; and here we had assembled with hundreds of happy saints, in the solemn meeting, and offered our prayers, and songs, and sacraments, in our humble dwellings; but now all was solemn and lonely desolation; not a vestage remained to mark the place where stood our former dwellings; they had long since been consumed by fire, or removed to the village and converted to the use of our enemies. While at we were once or twice invited to dine with , and others, which we did, with much apparent politeness and attention on their part, and much cheerfulness and good felling on our own.
After about a week spent in this way, during which I was at one time alone in the wilderness, more than a mile from , we were at length (after repeated demands) sent to , at . This place was on the same side of that was, and about thirty miles distant. Generals and had tried in vain to get a guard to accompany us; none would volunteer, and when drafted, they would not obey orders; for, in truth, they wished us to go at liberty. At last a colonel and two or three officers started with us, with their swords and pistols, which was more to protect us than to keep us from escaping. On this journey some of us [p. 47]
Page 47