Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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rode in carriages, and some on horseback. Some times we were sixty or eighty rods in front or rear of  our guard, who, by the by, were three sheets in the  wind, in the whiskey line, having a bottle in their poc kets; but knowing that we were not guilty of any  crime, we did not wish to escape by flight. At night,  having crossed the ferry, we put up at a private  house. Here our guards all went to bed and to sleep,  leaving us their pistols to defend ourselves in case of  any attack from without, as we were in a very hos tile neighborhood.
Next morn we rode a few miles, and were met by  an express from , at , consisting  of and a company of soldiers, who imme diately surrounded us with poised pieces, in regular  military order, as if we had been Bonaparte and his  body guards, on a march from St. Helena; thinking,  perhaps, that if we should escape, the  and all Europe would be immediately overthrown.  In this way we were escorted to , the head  quarters of and his army, which  was composed of three or four thousand men. Here,  as usual, we had to endure the gaze of the curious, as  if we had been a caravan of exhibiting animals. We  were conducted, with some military parade, into a  block house, and immediately put in chains; besides  a strong guard, who stood over us night and day, with  presented rifles and pistols. We were soon intro duced to , who seemed more haughty, un feeling, and reserved, than even or .
We enquired of the what were his inten tions concerning us. I stated to him that we had now  been captives for many days, and we knew not where fore; nor whether we were considered prisoners of  war, or prisoners of civil process, or prisoners of hope;  at the same time remarking that all was wrapt in  mystery; for, as citizens of the , and of  , in time of peace, we could not be consider [p. 48]
rode in carriages, and some on horseback. Sometimes we were sixty or eighty rods in front or rear of our guard, who, by the by, were three sheets in the wind, in the whiskey line, having a bottle in their pockets; but knowing that we were not guilty of any crime, we did not wish to escape by flight. At night, having crossed the ferry, we put up at a private house. Here our guards all went to bed and to sleep, leaving us their pistols to defend ourselves in case of any attack from without, as we were in a very hostile neighborhood.
Next morn we rode a few miles, and were met by an express from , at , consisting of and a company of soldiers, who immediately surrounded us with poised pieces, in regular military order, as if we had been Bonaparte and his body guards, on a march from St. Helena; thinking, perhaps, that if we should escape, the and all Europe would be immediately overthrown. In this way we were escorted to , the head quarters of and his army, which was composed of three or four thousand men. Here, as usual, we had to endure the gaze of the curious, as if we had been a caravan of exhibiting animals. We were conducted, with some military parade, into a block house, and immediately put in chains; besides a strong guard, who stood over us night and day, with presented rifles and pistols. We were soon introduced to , who seemed more haughty, unfeeling, and reserved, than even or .
We enquired of the what were his intentions concerning us. I stated to him that we had now been captives for many days, and we knew not wherefore; nor whether we were considered prisoners of war, or prisoners of civil process, or prisoners of hope; at the same time remarking that all was wrapt in mystery; for, as citizens of the , and of , in time of peace, we could not be consider [p. 48]
Page 48