Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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murderers put their guns through the crevices be tween the logs, and shot the dead and dying thro’ and  through, as a token of bravery, and also to glut their  bloodthirsty disposition.
A little boy had crawled under the bellows in hopes  to escape; but, on being discovered, he was instantly  shot. Another little boy, of nine years of age, whose  father () had just fell dead, cried out to  the enemy to spare his life; but they replied, “Kill  him—God damn it, kill him—he is the son of a  damned Mormon!” At this they shot his head all  open, and laid him sprawling by his father; thus  leaving Mrs. Smith to mourn the loss of husband and  child both at once. This was a worthy family, from  , who had long been near neighbors to me; and  better neighbors I never had. About the same time,  an old soldier of the revolution, by the name of , came up to them and begged for his life; but  they hewed him in pieces with some old pieces of a  sythe. The women fled, but were fired upon; and  one young lady (Mary Steadwell, from , who was  a worthy lady, and had been a member of my family,)  was shot in the hand while fleeing, and fell behind a  log in time to save her life, just as a shower of balls  struck it.
The robbers then loaded themselves with house hold plunder and departed. These particulars are  as we have learned them; but being confined in pri son, we lack much information on the subject of the  Hauns’ Mill massacre, which will doubtless be given  in the writings of others. Now to return to the sub ject as we left it at .
I must not forget to state that when we arrived at   as prisoners, there were some fifty others,  mostly heads of families, who had been marched from   on foot, and were now penned up in a cold,  open, unfinished court house; in which situation they  remained for some weeks, while their families were [p. 51]
murderers put their guns through the crevices between the logs, and shot the dead and dying thro’ and through, as a token of bravery, and also to glut their bloodthirsty disposition.
A little boy had crawled under the bellows in hopes to escape; but, on being discovered, he was instantly shot. Another little boy, of nine years of age, whose father () had just fell dead, cried out to the enemy to spare his life; but they replied, “Kill him—God damn it, kill him—he is the son of a damned Mormon!” At this they shot his head all open, and laid him sprawling by his father; thus leaving Mrs. Smith to mourn the loss of husband and child both at once. This was a worthy family, from , who had long been near neighbors to me; and better neighbors I never had. About the same time, an old soldier of the revolution, by the name of , came up to them and begged for his life; but they hewed him in pieces with some old pieces of a sythe. The women fled, but were fired upon; and one young lady (Mary Steadwell, from , who was a worthy lady, and had been a member of my family,) was shot in the hand while fleeing, and fell behind a log in time to save her life, just as a shower of balls struck it.
The robbers then loaded themselves with household plunder and departed. These particulars are as we have learned them; but being confined in prison, we lack much information on the subject of the Hauns’ Mill massacre, which will doubtless be given in the writings of others. Now to return to the subject as we left it at .
I must not forget to state that when we arrived at as prisoners, there were some fifty others, mostly heads of families, who had been marched from on foot, and were now penned up in a cold, open, unfinished court house; in which situation they remained for some weeks, while their families were [p. 51]
Page 51