Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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filthy dungeon. My family were conveyed to , Illinois, distance one hundred and eighty miles, by , of , who is a descendant of the celebrated martyr, John Rogers, of Smithfield, England.
On the 26th of April, 1839, the last of the Society departed from . Thus had a whole people consisting of about 10 or 11 thousand souls, been driven from houses and lands, and reduced to poverty, and had removed to another State during one short winter, and part of a spring. The sacrifice of property was immense, probably amounting to several millions, and one of the most flourishing counties of the , and part of several others, were reduced to desolation, or inhabited by gangs of robbers.
On the 24th of April, our cases were had before the Grand Jury of the county of ; and and Norman Shearer were dismissed, after being imprisoned near six months. This release happened just as Mr. Shearer came to visit his son for the last time before he left the country. He came into the prison to see us, and not knowing of the intended release, he took an affctionate leave of us and of his son, who seemed to weep with heart-broken anguish. But while he yet lingered in town, his son was called before the court, and with , was told that they might go at liberty. The father and son then embraced each other, almost overcome with joy, and depa[r]ted. At the same time my brother , whom I had not before seen for a year, came from to see me, but was only permitted to visit me for a few moments, and then was ordered to depart. Mrs. [Laura Clark] Phelps, who had waited in prison for some days, in hopes that the court would release her husband, now parted with him, overwhelmed with sorrow and tears, and with her infant, moved slowly away, to remove alone to , and leave her husband behind. Thus our families wander [p. 59]
filthy dungeon. My family were conveyed to , Illinois, distance one hundred and eighty miles, by , of , who is a descendant of the celebrated martyr, John Rogers, of Smithfield, England.
On the 26th of April, 1839, the last of the Society departed from . Thus had a whole people consisting of about 10 or 11 thousand souls, been driven from houses and lands, and reduced to poverty, and had removed to another State during one short winter, and part of a spring. The sacrifice of property was immense, probably amounting to several millions, and one of the most flourishing counties of the , and part of several others, were reduced to desolation, or inhabited by gangs of robbers.
On the 24th of April, our cases were had before the Grand Jury of the county of ; and and Norman Shearer were dismissed, after being imprisoned near six months. This release happened just as Mr. Shearer came to visit his son for the last time before he left the country. He came into the prison to see us, and not knowing of the intended release, he took an affctionate leave of us and of his son, who seemed to weep with heart-broken anguish. But while he yet lingered in town, his son was called before the court, and with , was told that they might go at liberty. The father and son then embraced each other, almost overcome with joy, and departed. At the same time my brother , whom I had not before seen for a year, came from to see me, but was only permitted to visit me for a few moments, and then was ordered to depart. Mrs. Laura Clark Phelps, who had waited in prison for some days, in hopes that the court would release her husband, now parted with him, overwhelmed with sorrow and tears, and with her infant, moved slowly away, to remove alone to , and leave her husband behind. Thus our families wander [p. 59]
Page 59