Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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made of doubled oak plank, and nearly as much as a man could raise. I lifted it up and went up; the little girl followed, and while holding it for her to come up, by some means the strap by which I held it, slipped from my grasp, and it fell upon the head, and caught the arm of the child. It was seized instantly, and raised up again and the child rescued from the top of the ladder before she fell to the bottom of the dungeon; her head and arm were dreadfully bruised. Meantime, the guards and sheriff, had halted to chat with some one within a few rods of the jail. At this moment I ordered Mrs. Pratt to run below and take the manuscript from its place in the straw bed, and instantly replace it about her person, while at the same time I would call to the sheriff and guards, and inform them that our little girl was dreadfully hurt, and that her mother wished to go out instantly for some spirits to put in her camphor bottle to bathe the bruised child. This was instantly done, the alarm was given, the guards came running, and unlocked the door, and we told them that our little girl was dreadfully hurt; at which Mrs. Pratt, with the manuscript concealed about her person, instantly took the child and hastened out with much fright, lest the child was nearly killed. Under these circumstances, the guard could make no objection to her going; it being a poor time indeed to wait for searching or ceremony.— The little child though much hurt, was not so badly injured as we expected; she was soon as well as ever.— When she had gone out into a house near the prison, and had taken care of the child, I feared that they would search her then, and search the house. At this moment Mrs. Gibbs happened to the door of the prison, and by watching a good opportunity, I handed her a scrap of writing, folded up to the bigness of my thumb nail. In this was written as follows: Mrs. Pratt let the truth remain with the people of . At the same time my shoes needing some new soles on them, I pulled them off, and called the guard to hand them to Mrs. Pratt, and request her to carry them to the shoemaker, and get them mended. The fact was this: liv [p. 67]
made of doubled oak plank, and nearly as much as a man could raise. I lifted it up and went up; the little girl followed, and while holding it for her to come up, by some means the strap by which I held it, slipped from my grasp, and it fell upon the head, and caught the arm of the child. It was seized instantly, and raised up again and the child rescued from the top of the ladder before she fell to the bottom of the dungeon; her head and arm were dreadfully bruised. Meantime, the guards and sheriff, had halted to chat with some one within a few rods of the jail. At this moment I ordered Mrs. Pratt to run below and take the manuscript from its place in the straw bed, and instantly replace it about her person, while at the same time I would call to the sheriff and guards, and inform them that our little girl was dreadfully hurt, and that her mother wished to go out instantly for some spirits to put in her camphor bottle to bathe the bruised child. This was instantly done, the alarm was given, the guards came running, and unlocked the door, and we told them that our little girl was dreadfully hurt; at which Mrs. Pratt, with the manuscript concealed about her person, instantly took the child and hastened out with much fright, lest the child was nearly killed. Under these circumstances, the guard could make no objection to her going; it being a poor time indeed to wait for searching or ceremony.— The little child though much hurt, was not so badly injured as we expected; she was soon as well as ever.— When she had gone out into a house near the prison, and had taken care of the child, I feared that they would search her then, and search the house. At this moment Mrs. Gibbs happened to the door of the prison, and by watching a good opportunity, I handed her a scrap of writing, folded up to the bigness of my thumb nail. In this was written as follows: Mrs. Pratt let the truth remain with the people of . At the same time my shoes needing some new soles on them, I pulled them off, and called the guard to hand them to Mrs. Pratt, and request her to carry them to the shoemaker, and get them mended. The fact was this: liv [p. 67]
Page 67