Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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nesses were banished the . Under these circumstances we were unwilling to be tried in a where all law and justice were at an end. We accordingly thought it justifiable to make our escape. In the mean time, we were visited by Mrs. Phelps, the wife of one of the prisoners, and also by my brother, , and Mrs. Phelps’ brother, these all came from or , on horseback, and visited with us for several days. On the 4th of July, we felt desirous as usual to celebrate the anniversary of American liberty. We accordingly manufactured a white flag, consisting of the half of a shirt on which was inscribed the word Liberty, in large letters, and also a large American Eagle was put on in red, we then obtained a pole from our jailor, and on the morning of the 4th, this flag was suspended from the front window of our prison, overhanging the public square, and floating triumphantly in the air to the full view of the citizens who assembled by hundreds to celebrate the national Jubilee. With this the citizens seemed highly pleased and sent a portion of the public dinner to us and our friends, who partook with us in prison with merry hearts, as we intended to gain our liberties or be in paradise before the close of that eventful day. While we were thus employed in prison, the town was alive with troops parading, guns firing, music sounding, and shouts of joy resounding on every side. In the mean time we wrote the following toast, which was read at their public dinner, with many and long cheers:
The patriotic and hospitable citizens of Boon[e] county: opposed to tyranny and oppression, and firm to the original principles of Republican Liberty—may they in common with every part of our wide spreading country, long enjoy the blessings which flow from the fountain of American Independence.* Our din
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*The inhabitants of Boon county being mostly Whigs, were opposed to the proceedings of the against our people. [p. 76]
nesses were banished the . Under these circumstances we were unwilling to be tried in a where all law and justice were at an end. We accordingly thought it justifiable to make our escape. In the mean time, we were visited by Mrs. Phelps, the wife of one of the prisoners, and also by my brother, , and Mrs. Phelps’ brother, these all came from or , on horseback, and visited with us for several days. On the 4th of July, we felt desirous as usual to celebrate the anniversary of American liberty. We accordingly manufactured a white flag, consisting of the half of a shirt on which was inscribed the word Liberty, in large letters, and also a large American Eagle was put on in red, we then obtained a pole from our jailor, and on the morning of the 4th, this flag was suspended from the front window of our prison, overhanging the public square, and floating triumphantly in the air to the full view of the citizens who assembled by hundreds to celebrate the national Jubilee. With this the citizens seemed highly pleased and sent a portion of the public dinner to us and our friends, who partook with us in prison with merry hearts, as we intended to gain our liberties or be in paradise before the close of that eventful day. While we were thus employed in prison, the town was alive with troops parading, guns firing, music sounding, and shouts of joy resounding on every side. In the mean time we wrote the following toast, which was read at their public dinner, with many and long cheers:
The patriotic and hospitable citizens of Boone county: opposed to tyranny and oppression, and firm to the original principles of Republican Liberty—may they in common with every part of our wide spreading country, long enjoy the blessings which flow from the fountain of American Independence.* Our din
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*The inhabitants of Boon county being mostly Whigs, were opposed to the proceedings of the against our people. [p. 76]
Page 76