Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 77
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ner being ended, our two brethren took leave of us  and started for , (leaving Mrs. Phelps to still  visit with her husband;) they had proceeded a mile  or two on the road and then took into the woods, and  finally placed their three horses in a thicket within  one third of a mile of the prison, and there they wait ed in anxious suspense till sundown. In the mean  time we put on our coats and hats and waited for the  setting sun. With prayer and supplication for deliv erance from this long and tedious bondage, and for a  restoration to the society of our friends and families,  we then sung the following lines:
Lord, cause their foolish plans to fail,
And let them faint or die,
Our souls would quit this loathsome jail,
And fly to .
 
To join with the embodied Saints,
Who are with freedom blessed,
That only bliss for which we pant,
With them a while to rest.
 
Give joy for grief—give ease for pain,
Take all our foes away;
But let us find our friends again,
In this eventful day.
This ended the celebration of our National Liber ty, but the gaining of our own was the grand achieve ment now before us. In the mean time, the sun was  setting; the moment arrived, the footsteps of the  jailor were heard on the stairs, every man flew to his  feet, and stood near the door—the great door was  opened, and our supper handed in through a small  hole in the inner door, which still remained locked,  but at length the key was turned in order to hand in  the pot of coffee. No sooner was the key turned,  than the door was jerked open, and in a moment all  three of us were out and rushing down the stairs, the  foremost, Mr. Phelps, was clinched by the jailor, both  tumbled down the stairs, through the entry and out  into the door yard, when Phelps cleared himself with [p. 77]
ner being ended, our two brethren took leave of us and started for , (leaving Mrs. Phelps to still visit with her husband;) they had proceeded a mile or two on the road and then took into the woods, and finally placed their three horses in a thicket within one third of a mile of the prison, and there they waited in anxious suspense till sundown. In the mean time we put on our coats and hats and waited for the setting sun. With prayer and supplication for deliverance from this long and tedious bondage, and for a restoration to the society of our friends and families, we then sung the following lines:
Lord, cause their foolish plans to fail,
And let them faint or die,
Our souls would quit this loathsome jail,
And fly to .
 
To join with the embodied Saints,
Who are with freedom blessed,
That only bliss for which we pant,
With them a while to rest.
 
Give joy for grief—give ease for pain,
Take all our foes away;
But let us find our friends again,
In this eventful day.
This ended the celebration of our National Liberty, but the gaining of our own was the grand achievement now before us. In the mean time, the sun was setting; the moment arrived, the footsteps of the jailor were heard on the stairs, every man flew to his feet, and stood near the door—the great door was opened, and our supper handed in through a small hole in the inner door, which still remained locked, but at length the key was turned in order to hand in the pot of coffee. No sooner was the key turned, than the door was jerked open, and in a moment all three of us were out and rushing down the stairs, the foremost, Mr. Phelps, was clinched by the jailor, both tumbled down the stairs, through the entry and out into the door yard, when Phelps cleared himself with [p. 77]
Page 77