Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 82
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Fifthly, all these inhuman outrages and crimes go unpunished, and are unnoticed by you, Sir, and by all the authotities of the .
Sixthly, the Legislature of the has approved of and sanctioned this act of banishment, with all the crimes connected with it, by voting some two hundred thousand dollars for the payment of troops engaged in this unlawful, unconstitutional and treasonable enterprize. In monarchial Governments, the banishment of criminals, after their trial and legal condemnation, has been frequently resorted to—but the banishment of innocent women and children from house and home and country, to wander in a land of strangers, unprotected and unprovided for, while their husbands and fathers are retained in dungeons, to be tried by some other law, is an act unknown in the annals of history, except in this single instance, in the nineteenth century, when it has actually transpired in a Republican State, where the Constitution guarantees to every man the protection of life and property, and the right of trial by jury. These are outrages which would put monarchy to the blush, and from which the most despotic tyrants of the dark ages would turn away with shame and disgust.
In these proceedings, has enrolled her name on the list of immortal fame; her transactions will be handed down the stream of time to the latest posterity, who will read with wonder and astonishment the history of proceedings which are without a parallel in the annals of time. Why should the authorities of the strain at a gnat and swallow a camel? Why be so strictly legal as to compel me, through all the forms of a slow and legal prosecution previous to my enlargement, out of a pretence of respect to the laws of the statute which have been openly trampled upon and disregarded towards us from first to last? Why not include me in the general, wholesale banishment of our Society, that I may sup [p. 82]
Fifthly, all these inhuman outrages and crimes go unpunished, and are unnoticed by you, Sir, and by all the authotities of the .
Sixthly, the Legislature of the has approved of and sanctioned this act of banishment, with all the crimes connected with it, by voting some two hundred thousand dollars for the payment of troops engaged in this unlawful, unconstitutional and treasonable enterprize. In monarchial Governments, the banishment of criminals, after their trial and legal condemnation, has been frequently resorted to—but the banishment of innocent women and children from house and home and country, to wander in a land of strangers, unprotected and unprovided for, while their husbands and fathers are retained in dungeons, to be tried by some other law, is an act unknown in the annals of history, except in this single instance, in the nineteenth century, when it has actually transpired in a Republican State, where the Constitution guarantees to every man the protection of life and property, and the right of trial by jury. These are outrages which would put monarchy to the blush, and from which the most despotic tyrants of the dark ages would turn away with shame and disgust.
In these proceedings, has enrolled her name on the list of immortal fame; her transactions will be handed down the stream of time to the latest posterity, who will read with wonder and astonishment the history of proceedings which are without a parallel in the annals of time. Why should the authorities of the strain at a gnat and swallow a camel? Why be so strictly legal as to compel me, through all the forms of a slow and legal prosecution previous to my enlargement, out of a pretence of respect to the laws of the statute which have been openly trampled upon and disregarded towards us from first to last? Why not include me in the general, wholesale banishment of our Society, that I may sup [p. 82]
Page 82