Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 83
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port my family which are now reduced to beggary in  a land of strangers.
But when the authorities of the shall redress  all these wrongs; shall punish the guilty according to  the law; and shall restore my family and friends to all  the rights of which we have been unlawfully depri ved both in and all other counties; and shall  pay all the damages which we as a people have sus tained, then I shall believe them sincere in their pro fessed zeal for law and justice—then shall I be con vinced that I can have a fair trial in the . But  until then, I hereby solemnly protest against being  tried in this , with the full and conscientious  conviction, that I have no just grounds to expect a  fair and impartial trial.
I therefore most sincerely pray your Honor and all  the authorities of the , to either banish me with out further prosecution; or I freely consent to a trial  before the Judiciary of the .
With sentiments of high consideration and due re spect, I have the honor to subscribe myself, your  Honor’s most humble and obedient, etc.
.
Hon. .
’S DEFENCE.
 
As down a lone dungeon, with darkness o’erspread,
In silence and sorrow I made my lone bed,
While far from my prison my friends had retired,
And joy from this bosom had almost expired.
 
From all that was lovely, constrained for to part,
From wife and from children so dear to my heart;
While foes were exulting, and friends far away,
In half broken slumbers, all pensive I lay.
 
I though upon Zion—her sorrowful doom:—
I thought on her anguish—her trouble and gloom,
How for years she had wandered, a captive forlorn,
Cast out and afflicted, and treated with scorn.
 
I thought on the time when some five years ago,
Twelve hundred from , were driven by foes, [p. 83]
port my family which are now reduced to beggary in a land of strangers.
But when the authorities of the shall redress all these wrongs; shall punish the guilty according to the law; and shall restore my family and friends to all the rights of which we have been unlawfully deprived both in and all other counties; and shall pay all the damages which we as a people have sustained, then I shall believe them sincere in their professed zeal for law and justice—then shall I be convinced that I can have a fair trial in the . But until then, I hereby solemnly protest against being tried in this , with the full and conscientious conviction, that I have no just grounds to expect a fair and impartial trial.
I therefore most sincerely pray your Honor and all the authorities of the , to either banish me without further prosecution; or I freely consent to a trial before the Judiciary of the .
With sentiments of high consideration and due respect, I have the honor to subscribe myself, your Honor’s most humble and obedient, etc.
.
Hon. .
’S DEFENCE.
 
As down a lone dungeon, with darkness o’erspread,
In silence and sorrow I made my lone bed,
While far from my prison my friends had retired,
And joy from this bosom had almost expired.
 
From all that was lovely, constrained for to part,
From wife and from children so dear to my heart;
While foes were exulting, and friends far away,
In half broken slumbers, all pensive I lay.
 
I though upon Zion—her sorrowful doom:—
I thought on her anguish—her trouble and gloom,
How for years she had wandered, a captive forlorn,
Cast out and afflicted, and treated with scorn.
 
I thought on the time when some five years ago,
Twelve hundred from , were driven by foes, [p. 83]
Page 83