Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the State, where they live. Threatenings were again heard from ,  , Clinton, Platt and counties, that they were going to  raise another mob and come and drive the citizens out of .  The emigration was so rapid, and so great, that in the space of eigh teen months after the first settlement in , there was not room  enough for the people in that , and they were under the neces sity of seeking habitations some where else; and a number went into  , which was north of . Soon after the settle ments commenced in , a mob made its appearance,  forbidding them to settle there under pain of death. However, this  was not regarded, and the settlements which were made in different  parts of the , were increasing daily, until one or two whole  townships were entered, besides large bodies of land entered in other  parts of the , in such parts of the as had come into  market; besides, a large number of improvements were bought, under  the expectation of getting pre-emption rights. The mob spirit which  first made its appearance in , for a season seemed to  sleep, and there was no hindrance offered to the settlements, which  were increasing very fast. All parties remained quiet; many of those  who had been engaged in the first mob in , came forward and  made confession of their wrongs; and all, so far as was con cerned, was peace: but , ,Clinton and Platt, kept up a con tinual threatening, until it could not be borne any longer: and the  saints openly declared that it should cease, for they would suffer it no  longer. No person should come into the streets of as they  had been accustomed to do, and there threaten the people with mobs.  This had the desired effect; it ceased, and no persons ventured to do  so any more. But the before-mentioned counties kept up a contin ual threatening at home, whenever they saw any of the people of  .
This order of things continued without any violence, until the elec tion which took place in August, 1838. The saints had been in   from August, 1836, making two years.
Threatenings were making that they should not vote at the election.  Not only was it threatened that they should not vote in , but there were insinuations thrown out, that there would be a  mob in to prevent the people there from voting. There  were no great fears, however, entertained that any attempt of the kind  would be made. The election at last came on; and the saints went  to discharge what they considered not only a privilege but a duty also.  One of the candidates for representative in , was by  the name of , a very ignorant, ambitious creature,  who was determined to carry his election if possible, and that at all  hazards, whether the people were willing to elect him or not. Those  who were not willing to vote for him, he determined by the force of  mob law, to prevent from voting.
It may not, however, be amiss here to give an account of this said  ’s manoeuvres during the electioneering campaign. He was,  at the time, the colonel of the militia in , and had been  the leader in the first mob which had been raised to prevent the saints  from making settlements in , in the first instance, of  which mention has been made. When the electioneering campaign [p. 15]
the State, where they live. Threatenings were again heard from , , Clinton, Platt and counties, that they were going to raise another mob and come and drive the citizens out of . The emigration was so rapid, and so great, that in the space of eighteen months after the first settlement in , there was not room enough for the people in that , and they were under the necessity of seeking habitations some where else; and a number went into , which was north of . Soon after the settlements commenced in , a mob made its appearance, forbidding them to settle there under pain of death. However, this was not regarded, and the settlements which were made in different parts of the , were increasing daily, until one or two whole townships were entered, besides large bodies of land entered in other parts of the , in such parts of the as had come into market; besides, a large number of improvements were bought, under the expectation of getting pre-emption rights. The mob spirit which first made its appearance in , for a season seemed to sleep, and there was no hindrance offered to the settlements, which were increasing very fast. All parties remained quiet; many of those who had been engaged in the first mob in , came forward and made confession of their wrongs; and all, so far as was concerned, was peace: but , ,Clinton and Platt, kept up a continual threatening, until it could not be borne any longer: and the saints openly declared that it should cease, for they would suffer it no longer. No person should come into the streets of as they had been accustomed to do, and there threaten the people with mobs. This had the desired effect; it ceased, and no persons ventured to do so any more. But the before-mentioned counties kept up a continual threatening at home, whenever they saw any of the people of .
This order of things continued without any violence, until the election which took place in August, 1838. The saints had been in from August, 1836, making two years.
Threatenings were making that they should not vote at the election. Not only was it threatened that they should not vote in , but there were insinuations thrown out, that there would be a mob in to prevent the people there from voting. There were no great fears, however, entertained that any attempt of the kind would be made. The election at last came on; and the saints went to discharge what they considered not only a privilege but a duty also. One of the candidates for representative in , was by the name of , a very ignorant, ambitious creature, who was determined to carry his election if possible, and that at all hazards, whether the people were willing to elect him or not. Those who were not willing to vote for him, he determined by the force of mob law, to prevent from voting.
It may not, however, be amiss here to give an account of this said ’s manoeuvres during the electioneering campaign. He was, at the time, the colonel of the militia in , and had been the leader in the first mob which had been raised to prevent the saints from making settlements in , in the first instance, of which mention has been made. When the electioneering campaign [p. 15]
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