Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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had fairly commenced, great exertions were made by the different  candidates and their friends, to obtain the votes of the saints; each  man, in his turn, making application. , like the rest, made  application also. , who was a man of influence among the  saints, was the one to whom said made overtures. ,  knowing that had always been an enemy to the saints, took  the liberty to ask about his former hostilities, and his pre vious attempt to drive them from their homes; as well as many abu sive things which he had said. declared that he never had  any intention of driving them from their homes; he only tried to scare  them, and if he could not, he intended to let them alone: and as  to the many abusive things which he had said; he said “they were  very wrong; he had been deceived by false reports, without being  acquainted with the people; and, since he had become acquainted  with them, he found that they were first rate citizens.” And by many  such sayings, he attempted to gain votes: but the saints, all the time  knowing that he was corrupt man, and every way disqualified for  the office after which he was struggling, would not be induced to vote  for him at all. This he fully understood before the election, and made  his arrangements accordingly: having his satelites at the election, to  aid him in executing his purpose, in preventing the saints from voting.  In the early part of the day, at the election, made a speech;  the object of which was, to excite the indignation of the people, to  such a degree, that he could get a sufficient number to join the mob,  to keep the saints from voting, if they attempted it. In this speech,  he used the most abusive language that he was the master of; denouncing  the saints in round terms, in a most ridiculous manner. Having his  party ready, at the end of the speech, they began to throw out their  threats, that none of the G—d d—n Mormons, to use their own lan guage, should vote. These threatenings began to assume a very  serious tone, very soon. One kept exciting another, and drinking  very freely, until a man by the name of Richard Weldon, attacked  a man by the name of Samuel Brown, who was but just able to be  about, after a very dangerous fit of sickness. The said Weldon  began to insult Mr. Brown in a most insolent manner; Mr. Brown  very mildly told him, that he did not wish to have any difficulty with  him, or any other person; the other swore that the Mormons were  no more fit to vote than the d—d niggers, and that he would knock  him down; and made an attempt to strike him. A man by the name  of Perry Durfee, being near them, caught Weldon’s hand, and kept  him from striking Brown. This was no sooner done, than Durfee was  knocked down, and a number of men commenced beating him with  clubs, boards, and any thing they could get. Durfee cried for help:  several men ran into the midst of the crowd, to get Durfee out of their  hands, for the cry was, “kill him, kill him, d—n him. The names  of those who rushed into the crowd, were Jackson Steward, , Henry Ormsted Harvey Olmsted, Abram Nelson, and one other man by the  name of Nelson. They succeeded in saving the life of Durfee, but  not until they had knocked down some twelve or fifteen men. A large  number, of from twelve to twenty, rushed on to Steward, crying kill  him, God d—n him, kill him. They had dirks and clubs, and other  weapons; one of them dirked him under the shoulder blade; he called [p. 16]
had fairly commenced, great exertions were made by the different candidates and their friends, to obtain the votes of the saints; each man, in his turn, making application. , like the rest, made application also. , who was a man of influence among the saints, was the one to whom said made overtures. , knowing that had always been an enemy to the saints, took the liberty to ask about his former hostilities, and his previous attempt to drive them from their homes; as well as many abusive things which he had said. declared that he never had any intention of driving them from their homes; he only tried to scare them, and if he could not, he intended to let them alone: and as to the many abusive things which he had said; he said “they were very wrong; he had been deceived by false reports, without being acquainted with the people; and, since he had become acquainted with them, he found that they were first rate citizens.” And by many such sayings, he attempted to gain votes: but the saints, all the time knowing that he was corrupt man, and every way disqualified for the office after which he was struggling, would not be induced to vote for him at all. This he fully understood before the election, and made his arrangements accordingly: having his satelites at the election, to aid him in executing his purpose, in preventing the saints from voting. In the early part of the day, at the election, made a speech; the object of which was, to excite the indignation of the people, to such a degree, that he could get a sufficient number to join the mob, to keep the saints from voting, if they attempted it. In this speech, he used the most abusive language that he was the master of; denouncing the saints in round terms, in a most ridiculous manner. Having his party ready, at the end of the speech, they began to throw out their threats, that none of the G—d d—n Mormons, to use their own language, should vote. These threatenings began to assume a very serious tone, very soon. One kept exciting another, and drinking very freely, until a man by the name of Richard Weldon, attacked a man by the name of Samuel Brown, who was but just able to be about, after a very dangerous fit of sickness. The said Weldon began to insult Mr. Brown in a most insolent manner; Mr. Brown very mildly told him, that he did not wish to have any difficulty with him, or any other person; the other swore that the Mormons were no more fit to vote than the d—d niggers, and that he would knock him down; and made an attempt to strike him. A man by the name of Perry Durfee, being near them, caught Weldon’s hand, and kept him from striking Brown. This was no sooner done, than Durfee was knocked down, and a number of men commenced beating him with clubs, boards, and any thing they could get. Durfee cried for help: several men ran into the midst of the crowd, to get Durfee out of their hands, for the cry was, “kill him, kill him, d—n him. The names of those who rushed into the crowd, were Jackson Steward, , Henry Ormsted Harvey Olmsted, Abram Nelson, and one other man by the name of Nelson. They succeeded in saving the life of Durfee, but not until they had knocked down some twelve or fifteen men. A large number, of from twelve to twenty, rushed on to Steward, crying kill him, God d—n him, kill him. They had dirks and clubs, and other weapons; one of them dirked him under the shoulder blade; he called [p. 16]
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