Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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State of ,) ss:
County of ,)
Before me, , one of the Justices of the County Court,  within and for the aforesaid, personally appeared and James Nelson, who, being duly sworn according to law, de poseth and saith, “that the aforesaid deposition of Samuel Brown,  relative to the aforesaid transaction, of the affray in ,  on the day of election, with all the circumstances and conversation  mentioned therein, are substantially true, to the best of our know ledge; and that we, the said deponents, were standing within three or  four feet of said Brown, when said conversation took place, and said  affray began:” and further, the deponents saith not.
(Signed) ,
JOHN NELSON.
Sworn and subscribed, this 5th day of September, A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
State of ,) ss:
County of ,)
Before me, , one of the Justices of the County Court,  within and for aforesaid, personally apeared ,  Abraham Nelson, Edmund Nelson, John Daley, and William W.  Patten, who, being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith,  that the aforesaid statement made by Samuel Brown, in his deposi tion of the late affray in , on the day of election, con cerning the speech of , and the beginning of the said  affray, are substantially true to the best of our knowledge.
(Signed) ,
ABRAHAM NELSON,
JOHN DALEY,
WILLIAM W. PATTEN.
Sworn to and subscribed, this 5th day of September, A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
After the election, threatenings were made in the most daring man ner, declaring that the Saints should leave the ; that they  would raise a mob and drive them out, and take all their lands and  other property as spoil. Indeed this was the secret which was work ing in their hearts all the time; and what they were determined to do.  It was the property of the Saints they wanted, and what they were  determined to have. They boasted that the authorities of the  would not interfere to assist the Mormons, as they called them. They  said it had been fairly proven, in the case of both and  counties, that the Government would not assist them; and they said  they might as well drive them off and take their property as not; for  they could not help themselves. With such language did they pro voke one another to acts of violence.
It will be seen by the above affidavits, that had pro hibited the Saints from voting when they resided there; and this cir cumstance tended to encourage others in their wickedness. All these  things were done in the face of the authorities, and it will be seen how  far they regarded their oaths of office. [p. 18]
State of ,) ss:
County of ,)
Before me, , one of the Justices of the County Court, within and for the aforesaid, personally appeared and James Nelson, who, being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, “that the aforesaid deposition of Samuel Brown, relative to the aforesaid transaction, of the affray in , on the day of election, with all the circumstances and conversation mentioned therein, are substantially true, to the best of our knowledge; and that we, the said deponents, were standing within three or four feet of said Brown, when said conversation took place, and said affray began:” and further, the deponents saith not.
(Signed) ,
JOHN NELSON.
Sworn and subscribed, this 5th day of September, A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
State of ,) ss:
County of ,)
Before me, , one of the Justices of the County Court, within and for aforesaid, personally apeared , Abraham Nelson, Edmund Nelson, John Daley, and William W. Patten, who, being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, that the aforesaid statement made by Samuel Brown, in his deposition of the late affray in , on the day of election, concerning the speech of , and the beginning of the said affray, are substantially true to the best of our knowledge.
(Signed) ,
ABRAHAM NELSON,
JOHN DALEY,
WILLIAM W. PATTEN.
Sworn to and subscribed, this 5th day of September, A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
After the election, threatenings were made in the most daring manner, declaring that the Saints should leave the ; that they would raise a mob and drive them out, and take all their lands and other property as spoil. Indeed this was the secret which was working in their hearts all the time; and what they were determined to do. It was the property of the Saints they wanted, and what they were determined to have. They boasted that the authorities of the would not interfere to assist the Mormons, as they called them. They said it had been fairly proven, in the case of both and counties, that the Government would not assist them; and they said they might as well drive them off and take their property as not; for they could not help themselves. With such language did they provoke one another to acts of violence.
It will be seen by the above affidavits, that had prohibited the Saints from voting when they resided there; and this circumstance tended to encourage others in their wickedness. All these things were done in the face of the authorities, and it will be seen how far they regarded their oaths of office. [p. 18]
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