Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ted him respecting the mob, and some angry words passed be tween them. , sent for Mr. Joseph Smith, Jr., who was at  the spring, to come into the house; accordingly he came in, the  matter was talked over; denied having any thing to do  with the mob, and said he never would have; and that as a peace  officer, he felt himself bound, as much to do justice to the saints,  as to other citizens, and he would do it. Mr. Smith then asked  him, if he had any objections to signing a paper to that effect, so  that it might be had for the benefit of those who entertained fears  on this matter. He said he had not, accordingly he wrote the  following note. We give it here without any alteration in ortho graphy, or composition.
“I, , a justice of the peace of , do  hereby sertify to the people coled Mormin, that he is bound to  suport the constitution of this , and of the , and  he is not attached to any mob nor will not attach himself to any  such people. And so long as they will not molest me, I will not  molest them.
This the 8th day of August, 1838.
(Signed) , J. P.”
After this transaction, the company returned to the village,  where many of the saints lived, called , to the  house of Col. . Shortly after their return to the house  of , three persons came from Millport—the whole mat ter was talked over, and it was agreed that there should be a  committee chosen from among the people of Millport and vicini ty; and also a committee appointed of the inhabitants of , to meet at , and have all the af fairs completely understood, and have peace. The committees  accordingly met. On the part of the people of Millport, there ap peared , senator elect; , representa tive elect; , Clerk of the Circuit Court, and sev eral others, names not known. On the part of the people of , were , , ,  . At this meeting, the strongest assurances were  given by both parties, that there should be no hostilities commenc ed on either part—that they all would abide the laws, and sup port them; and that no depredations of any kind should be com mitted on either part: and after the strongest, possible assur ances, each party returned home.
But while these pretended negotiations were going on, a cer tain portion of the mob of was running into the different  Counties, telling the people, that they were driven from their  houses, with their families, and that the Mormons were destroying  all their property; and calling on them for help. ,  , and some others, ran to , and there  made oath before ; the precise oath, as I have not a  copy of it, I cannot here insert; but the substance of it was, that  he had been compelled by a body of armed men which had sur rounded him, under pain of death, to sign an instrument of writing, [p. 20]
ted him respecting the mob, and some angry words passed between them. , sent for Mr. Joseph Smith, Jr., who was at the spring, to come into the house; accordingly he came in, the matter was talked over; denied having any thing to do with the mob, and said he never would have; and that as a peace officer, he felt himself bound, as much to do justice to the saints, as to other citizens, and he would do it. Mr. Smith then asked him, if he had any objections to signing a paper to that effect, so that it might be had for the benefit of those who entertained fears on this matter. He said he had not, accordingly he wrote the following note. We give it here without any alteration in orthography, or composition.
“I, , a justice of the peace of , do hereby sertify to the people coled Mormin, that he is bound to suport the constitution of this , and of the , and he is not attached to any mob nor will not attach himself to any such people. And so long as they will not molest me, I will not molest them.
This the 8th day of August, 1838.
(Signed) , J. P.”
After this transaction, the company returned to the village, where many of the saints lived, called , to the house of Col. . Shortly after their return to the house of , three persons came from Millport—the whole matter was talked over, and it was agreed that there should be a committee chosen from among the people of Millport and vicinity; and also a committee appointed of the inhabitants of , to meet at , and have all the affairs completely understood, and have peace. The committees accordingly met. On the part of the people of Millport, there appeared , senator elect; , representative elect; , Clerk of the Circuit Court, and several others, names not known. On the part of the people of , were , , , . At this meeting, the strongest assurances were given by both parties, that there should be no hostilities commenced on either part—that they all would abide the laws, and support them; and that no depredations of any kind should be committed on either part: and after the strongest, possible assurances, each party returned home.
But while these pretended negotiations were going on, a certain portion of the mob of was running into the different Counties, telling the people, that they were driven from their houses, with their families, and that the Mormons were destroying all their property; and calling on them for help. , , and some others, ran to , and there made oath before ; the precise oath, as I have not a copy of it, I cannot here insert; but the substance of it was, that he had been compelled by a body of armed men which had surrounded him, under pain of death, to sign an instrument of writing, [p. 20]
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