Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the truth concerning the said affray, which had been consider ably exagerated; yet, there had been a serious outrage commit ted. We there learned that the mob was collected at Millport,  to a considerable number, and that was at their  head, and were to attack the Saints the next day, at the place  where we then were, called ; this report, we were  inclined to believe might be true, as this , who was said  to be their leader, had been, but a few months before, engaged  in endeavoring to drive those of the society who had settled in  that vicinity, from the . This had become notorious from the  fact that said had personally ordered several of the said society  to leave the . The next morning we despatched a committee  to said ’s to ascertain the truth of these reports, and to know  what his intentions were; and, as we understood he was a peace offi cer, we wished to know what we might expect from him. They  report that , instead of giving them any assurance of pre serving the peace, insulted them and gave them no satisfaction.  Being desirous to know the feelings of for myself, and  being in want of good water, and understanding that there was none  nearer than ’s spring, myself, with several others, mounted  our horses and rode up to ’s fence. , with one or  two others who had rode ahead, went into ’s house, myself  and some others went to the spring for water—I was shortly after  sent for by and invited into the house, being introduced to   by , wished me to be seated. We then  commenced a conversation on the subject of the late difficulties, and  present excitement. I found quite hostile in his feelings  towards the Saints; but he assured us he did not belong to the mob,  neither would he take any part with them; but said he was bound by  his oath to support the constitution of the and the laws  of the State of . Deponent then asked him, if he would  make said statements in writing, so as to refute the arguments of those  who had affirmed that he () was one of the leaders of the mob.   answered in the affirmative; accordingly he did so, which  writing is in possession of the deponent. The deponent further saith,  that no violation was offered to any individual in his presence, or  within his knowledge; and that no insulting language was given by  either party, except on the part of Mrs. Black, who, while  was engaged in making out the above named writing, (which he made  with his own hand,) gave to this deponent, and others of the society,  highly insulting language, and false accusations, which were calcu lated in their nature to greatly irritate, if possible, the feelings of the  bystanders belonging to said society, in language like this:—being  asked by the deponent if she knew any thing in the Mormon people  derogatory to the character of gentlemen, she answered in the nega tive—but said she did not know but the object of their visit was to  steal something from them. After had executed the  writing deponent asked if he had any unfriendly feelings  towards the deponent, and if he had not treated him genteelly. He  answered in the affirmative; deponent then took leave of said ,  and repaired to the house of . The next day we re turned to . And further this deponent saith not.
(Signed) JOSEPH SMITH, Jr. [p. 22]
the truth concerning the said affray, which had been considerably exagerated; yet, there had been a serious outrage committed. We there learned that the mob was collected at Millport, to a considerable number, and that was at their head, and were to attack the Saints the next day, at the place where we then were, called ; this report, we were inclined to believe might be true, as this , who was said to be their leader, had been, but a few months before, engaged in endeavoring to drive those of the society who had settled in that vicinity, from the . This had become notorious from the fact that said had personally ordered several of the said society to leave the . The next morning we despatched a committee to said ’s to ascertain the truth of these reports, and to know what his intentions were; and, as we understood he was a peace officer, we wished to know what we might expect from him. They report that , instead of giving them any assurance of preserving the peace, insulted them and gave them no satisfaction. Being desirous to know the feelings of for myself, and being in want of good water, and understanding that there was none nearer than ’s spring, myself, with several others, mounted our horses and rode up to ’s fence. , with one or two others who had rode ahead, went into ’s house, myself and some others went to the spring for water—I was shortly after sent for by and invited into the house, being introduced to by , wished me to be seated. We then commenced a conversation on the subject of the late difficulties, and present excitement. I found quite hostile in his feelings towards the Saints; but he assured us he did not belong to the mob, neither would he take any part with them; but said he was bound by his oath to support the constitution of the and the laws of the State of . Deponent then asked him, if he would make said statements in writing, so as to refute the arguments of those who had affirmed that he () was one of the leaders of the mob. answered in the affirmative; accordingly he did so, which writing is in possession of the deponent. The deponent further saith, that no violation was offered to any individual in his presence, or within his knowledge; and that no insulting language was given by either party, except on the part of Mrs. Black, who, while was engaged in making out the above named writing, (which he made with his own hand,) gave to this deponent, and others of the society, highly insulting language, and false accusations, which were calculated in their nature to greatly irritate, if possible, the feelings of the bystanders belonging to said society, in language like this:—being asked by the deponent if she knew any thing in the Mormon people derogatory to the character of gentlemen, she answered in the negative—but said she did not know but the object of their visit was to steal something from them. After had executed the writing deponent asked if he had any unfriendly feelings towards the deponent, and if he had not treated him genteelly. He answered in the affirmative; deponent then took leave of said , and repaired to the house of . The next day we returned to . And further this deponent saith not.
(Signed) JOSEPH SMITH, Jr. [p. 22]
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