Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Sworn to and subscribed this fifth day of September, A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
But the case having undergone a legal investigation, had no ten dency to stop the operations of the mob; but it tended clearly to show  how much sincerity there was in their pretended zeal for the laws;  for in open and avowed violation of them, they went on to collect  together, and to gather into , from , Corrill [Carroll], , Clinton and Platt, and some from , openly declaring that  they would put the law at defiance, and the Saints should be driven  out. They, in the meantime, took their families away from their  house under the pretence of fear, and ran through the conntry, from  county to county telling how they were driven from their homes—got  up county meetings in the surrounding counties, particularly Jackson,  , Corrill, and . At these meetings, might be seen  preachers of the gospel, (as they called themselves,) drunkards, pro fane swearers, and all forming one company, and all declaring their  determination to aid their friends if necessary. In one of these mob  meetings in was seen , States attorney,  and now one of the judges; also, , who would  wish to be called a respectable lawyer. At these meetings the most  slanderous resolutions would be passed, that a people so basely igno rant as they were could invent. The mob, thus encouraged by judges,  lawyers, priests, &c., kept gathering in large numbers. The roads  were infested with them—companies of armed men were passing and  repassing in every direction, while a great majority of the principal  men of the country, if they did not join the mob, used no exertions to  prevent its operations. Among the rest that headed a gang of these  ruffians, was , who was the same season elected to  the State Senate. He had, but a short time before, been converted,  and united with the baptist church.
The whole body made its way to . On ’s  arrival the Saints were summoned to send a flag into his camp forth with, and receive terms at his hand. They, however, paid no atten tion to the mandate of this new potentate. After they had, as they  supposed, got sufficiently strong, they commenced taking cattle, corn,  &c., to feed their army. Cattle, horses and grain were taken with a  liberal hand; and they publicly boasted that they “lived on Mormon  beef, and Mormon corn.” The Saints dare not leave their homes, for  if they did, they were stopped on the road, they were shot at, their  horses taken from them, and to all appearance they would be ruined.  All the time the mob had their runners, telling that their wives and  children were driven from their homes—that their fences were thrown  down, and the Mormons were destroying all they had. Their wives  and children were either in the camp, or else sent off to some of their  friends in the adjoining counties—and all this they pretended was  through fear. But, to certain of their friends they said their object in  so doing was to keep the public ignorant of their real design; for they  did not wish their women and children there, when they drove the  Mormons out, lest they might get hurt. The Saints were all the  time making application to the authorities of the country to put down  the mob. Messengers after messengers were sent to the military offi [p. 23]
Sworn to and subscribed this fifth day of September, A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
But the case having undergone a legal investigation, had no tendency to stop the operations of the mob; but it tended clearly to show how much sincerity there was in their pretended zeal for the laws; for in open and avowed violation of them, they went on to collect together, and to gather into , from , Corrill [Carroll], , Clinton and Platt, and some from , openly declaring that they would put the law at defiance, and the Saints should be driven out. They, in the meantime, took their families away from their house under the pretence of fear, and ran through the conntry, from county to county telling how they were driven from their homes—got up county meetings in the surrounding counties, particularly Jackson, , Corrill, and . At these meetings, might be seen preachers of the gospel, (as they called themselves,) drunkards, profane swearers, and all forming one company, and all declaring their determination to aid their friends if necessary. In one of these mob meetings in was seen , States attorney, and now one of the judges; also, , who would wish to be called a respectable lawyer. At these meetings the most slanderous resolutions would be passed, that a people so basely ignorant as they were could invent. The mob, thus encouraged by judges, lawyers, priests, &c., kept gathering in large numbers. The roads were infested with them—companies of armed men were passing and repassing in every direction, while a great majority of the principal men of the country, if they did not join the mob, used no exertions to prevent its operations. Among the rest that headed a gang of these ruffians, was , who was the same season elected to the State Senate. He had, but a short time before, been converted, and united with the baptist church.
The whole body made its way to . On ’s arrival the Saints were summoned to send a flag into his camp forthwith, and receive terms at his hand. They, however, paid no attention to the mandate of this new potentate. After they had, as they supposed, got sufficiently strong, they commenced taking cattle, corn, &c., to feed their army. Cattle, horses and grain were taken with a liberal hand; and they publicly boasted that they “lived on Mormon beef, and Mormon corn.” The Saints dare not leave their homes, for if they did, they were stopped on the road, they were shot at, their horses taken from them, and to all appearance they would be ruined. All the time the mob had their runners, telling that their wives and children were driven from their homes—that their fences were thrown down, and the Mormons were destroying all they had. Their wives and children were either in the camp, or else sent off to some of their friends in the adjoining counties—and all this they pretended was through fear. But, to certain of their friends they said their object in so doing was to keep the public ignorant of their real design; for they did not wish their women and children there, when they drove the Mormons out, lest they might get hurt. The Saints were all the time making application to the authorities of the country to put down the mob. Messengers after messengers were sent to the military offi [p. 23]
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