Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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appearance at the circuit court. Thus were the laws of the land put  at defiance, to save from punishment a mob[b]er and plunderer, and that  by the judge of the circuit court, who was bound by oath to do other wise. There were three persons arrested, the principal of which was  , the others were only hired in his service.
This arrest took place on the 9th day of September, 1838, on the  first day of the week, and it was in the same week that Generals  , and , went with their troops to . It was during the operation of this mob the Saints had a fair  oportunity of trying the honesty of the civil officers of .  An old gentleman from by the name of Hoops was moving into  ; he had to pass through Millport, the residence of  the principal leaders of the mob; ,  whose name has been mentioned before, stopped his team forcibly in  the road, abused and insulted the family. Mr. Hoops was an entire  stranger in the —he was detained a number of hours before he  could get away from them. The old man went to a justice of the  peace and got a states warrant for him, gave it to an officer, and had  it served on him as they said, and had a day appointed for the trial.— When the day came was not there, but another man was  permitted to answer for him—and after the witnesses were all sworn,  and the facts of the unlawful detention proven, the justice pronounced  no cause of action. , in the meantime, had gone to Carroll  county to join another mob, which had met to drive out a settlement of  the Saints which had settled in that county. The name of the justice  was Covington. It was found that in every county in upper  the laws would not be put in force against the mob. The civil officers  would not regard their oaths, but in open violation of them, would  acquit the mob, notwithstanding the mob would boast of their crimes  in their presence. Up till this time, there was not a military or civil  officer in who had been called upon to quell this gang of  plunderers, that would abide by his oath of office, from the  down. When the civil officers were called upon they would give  decisions the most barefaced violations of law ever given by mortals,  so much so that they knew they were violating their oaths when they  did it. When the military were called upon, instead of bringing the  mob to justice, they would call them militia; which could be for no  other purpose but to keep them from the punishment justly due to  their crimes. After the mob had been honorably dismissed as militia  and ordered home, they took up their line of march directly to , in Carroll county, to drive out a settlement of the Saints in that  place; the history of which settlement we shall hereafter give.
Part of the mob which was at was from Carroll  county. Their principal leader was , commonly called  —he was a Presbyterian preacher. There was another  Presbyterian preacher with the Carroll county mob by the name of  Hancock. After the mob had departed for Carroll county, the inhabi tants of that had belonged to the mob, began to make propo sals to the Saints, either to sell or buy. Two committees were ap pointed for this purpose, one on each part; after some arrangement in  relation to the matter, the committee on the part of the Saints agreed  to buy out all the possessions which the mob had in , [p. 26]
appearance at the circuit court. Thus were the laws of the land put at defiance, to save from punishment a mobber and plunderer, and that by the judge of the circuit court, who was bound by oath to do otherwise. There were three persons arrested, the principal of which was , the others were only hired in his service.
This arrest took place on the 9th day of September, 1838, on the first day of the week, and it was in the same week that Generals , and , went with their troops to . It was during the operation of this mob the Saints had a fair oportunity of trying the honesty of the civil officers of . An old gentleman from by the name of Hoops was moving into ; he had to pass through Millport, the residence of the principal leaders of the mob; , whose name has been mentioned before, stopped his team forcibly in the road, abused and insulted the family. Mr. Hoops was an entire stranger in the —he was detained a number of hours before he could get away from them. The old man went to a justice of the peace and got a states warrant for him, gave it to an officer, and had it served on him as they said, and had a day appointed for the trial.—When the day came was not there, but another man was permitted to answer for him—and after the witnesses were all sworn, and the facts of the unlawful detention proven, the justice pronounced no cause of action. , in the meantime, had gone to Carroll county to join another mob, which had met to drive out a settlement of the Saints which had settled in that county. The name of the justice was Covington. It was found that in every county in upper the laws would not be put in force against the mob. The civil officers would not regard their oaths, but in open violation of them, would acquit the mob, notwithstanding the mob would boast of their crimes in their presence. Up till this time, there was not a military or civil officer in who had been called upon to quell this gang of plunderers, that would abide by his oath of office, from the down. When the civil officers were called upon they would give decisions the most barefaced violations of law ever given by mortals, so much so that they knew they were violating their oaths when they did it. When the military were called upon, instead of bringing the mob to justice, they would call them militia; which could be for no other purpose but to keep them from the punishment justly due to their crimes. After the mob had been honorably dismissed as militia and ordered home, they took up their line of march directly to , in Carroll county, to drive out a settlement of the Saints in that place; the history of which settlement we shall hereafter give.
Part of the mob which was at was from Carroll county. Their principal leader was , commonly called —he was a Presbyterian preacher. There was another Presbyterian preacher with the Carroll county mob by the name of Hancock. After the mob had departed for Carroll county, the inhabitants of that had belonged to the mob, began to make proposals to the Saints, either to sell or buy. Two committees were appointed for this purpose, one on each part; after some arrangement in relation to the matter, the committee on the part of the Saints agreed to buy out all the possessions which the mob had in , [p. 26]
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