Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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The object of ’s visit and the letter of which he was the  bearer, was to get some of the Saints to go to and buy a part  of the town plat, and aid in building it up. was ac quainted with many of the people of . During the first  visit of there was nothing done in the matter. At this time,  we were on our way, with our families, to , going there for the  purpose of making a home. On the evening of the 2d day of April,  stopped for the night, at the house of a man by the name of Morrison,  on Turkey Creek. There was the said , who had also put  up for the night, returning home from . He found out who  we were, and then told us he had been to , and what he had  been after; and also solicited our assistance in getting some of our  people to take part in building up the town of . Sometime  afterwards, came on the same errand, and it was not till  after repeated solicitations, and assurances of all the assistance that  we needed, in case of any difficulty, that there was any disposition  manifested on the part of the people of , to comply with their  request. However, after repeated solicitations, and strong assur ances given of the advantages of the place, and the facilities which it  would afford to the settlements making in the Upper , to  have a town, and of course a landing place on the ; at length a  man by the name of , and one by the name of , went to examine the place. It was in June, 1838, that they  went to make the purchase. After examining the place, they pur chased one-half of the town plat, and agreed with , from  whom they purchased, to move there with their families as soon as  they conveniently could, in order to commence building up the place.  Accordingly, in July following, they moved to . Soon after  their arrival a settlement began to be made. The Saints at the time  were immigrating into the country in considerable numbers, and a  portion of them stopped at . Some purchased farms in the  vicinity, others bought property in the town, and by the middle of  October there were as many as seventy families in the town and the  immediate neighborhood. They had bought and paid for consider able property, and were making arrangements to erect buildings and  other conveniences for their comfort.
Some short time after the settlement first began, there was a mob  meeting called at Carrollton, the county seat of Carroll county, and  resolutions passed of a very treasonable character. The proceedings  of this meeting were published in the public papers. They there re solved to drive the Saints out of the county, regardless of conse quences. A committee was appointed to go and warn them of their  danger, and to demand of them that they leave the county forthwith.  All these transactions were public, and perfectly known to the author ities of the country, but not the most distant attempt was made to  bring any of them to justice. In consequence of the apathy of the  government the mob went on to holding meeting after meeting, pass ing resolution after resolution, and threatening the Saints with death  unless they would leave their homes and property and go out of the  county. These proceedings were all public and notorious. This  mob was led by two Presbyterian preachers, one by the name of  , called , the other by the name of Hancock. [p. 28]
The object of ’s visit and the letter of which he was the bearer, was to get some of the Saints to go to and buy a part of the town plat, and aid in building it up. was acquainted with many of the people of . During the first visit of there was nothing done in the matter. At this time, we were on our way, with our families, to , going there for the purpose of making a home. On the evening of the 2d day of April, stopped for the night, at the house of a man by the name of Morrison, on Turkey Creek. There was the said , who had also put up for the night, returning home from . He found out who we were, and then told us he had been to , and what he had been after; and also solicited our assistance in getting some of our people to take part in building up the town of . Sometime afterwards, came on the same errand, and it was not till after repeated solicitations, and assurances of all the assistance that we needed, in case of any difficulty, that there was any disposition manifested on the part of the people of , to comply with their request. However, after repeated solicitations, and strong assurances given of the advantages of the place, and the facilities which it would afford to the settlements making in the Upper , to have a town, and of course a landing place on the ; at length a man by the name of , and one by the name of , went to examine the place. It was in June, 1838, that they went to make the purchase. After examining the place, they purchased one-half of the town plat, and agreed with , from whom they purchased, to move there with their families as soon as they conveniently could, in order to commence building up the place. Accordingly, in July following, they moved to . Soon after their arrival a settlement began to be made. The Saints at the time were immigrating into the country in considerable numbers, and a portion of them stopped at . Some purchased farms in the vicinity, others bought property in the town, and by the middle of October there were as many as seventy families in the town and the immediate neighborhood. They had bought and paid for considerable property, and were making arrangements to erect buildings and other conveniences for their comfort.
Some short time after the settlement first began, there was a mob meeting called at Carrollton, the county seat of Carroll county, and resolutions passed of a very treasonable character. The proceedings of this meeting were published in the public papers. They there resolved to drive the Saints out of the county, regardless of consequences. A committee was appointed to go and warn them of their danger, and to demand of them that they leave the county forthwith. All these transactions were public, and perfectly known to the authorities of the country, but not the most distant attempt was made to bring any of them to justice. In consequence of the apathy of the government the mob went on to holding meeting after meeting, passing resolution after resolution, and threatening the Saints with death unless they would leave their homes and property and go out of the county. These proceedings were all public and notorious. This mob was led by two Presbyterian preachers, one by the name of , called , the other by the name of Hancock. [p. 28]
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