Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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next morning, and the letter had to be carried some thirty or forty  miles. Here was another piece of legerdemain. was turned  into militia, to hide up his wickedness. We had this account from  the mouth of Samuel Tillary; he is a Clerk of the Circuit Court in   and acts as clerk for .
Let the reader particularly notice, that this , was  well acquainted with the operations of the mob, for the space of five  years; having been the leader of it once himself, at the time it raged  in ; and had been petitioned, again and again, after  he was Governor, to stop its ravages; and in every instance refused  to do it. He now perfectly knew that the whole difficulty, had origi nated in consequence of its violence and plunder: yet notwithstand ing this, he issued the above order. , said, that if it had not  been for the vote, which the Mormons gave at the late election, he  would have exterminated them before.
After the citizens of were made acquainted with the fact,  that was there, by the ’s order, they ceased  to take any measures for defence; but submitted immediately.
In the meantime, the army employed itself in destroying the corn fields, potatoes and turnips, and in taking horses and plundering  houses. Houses were searched by them, as closely to find money,  as a man would be searched by a set of Arabs after a shipwreck.  Every dollar was carried off, that could be found, while the lives of  the owners were threatened, if they offered the least resistance. Cat tle, hogs and sheep, were shot down, and left on the ground to rot.  Men, women and children, were insulted and abused, in a most brutal  manner!
We return again to the maneuvering of the Officers. In the even ing of the second day after their arrival, they sent a messenger to a  number of persons, informing them, that they wanted them to come  into their camp; as they wished to have a consultation with them:  and they pledged their sacred honors, that they should be at liberty  to return to the town, by eight o’clock, the next morning. The per sons, called for, were , , , Joseph Smith Jr., and . It was supposed that  confidence might be placed in the word of Major and Brigadier Gen erals; and accordingly, the persons called for, went into their camp.
When they started to go, instead of meeting a white flag, as was  expected to conduct them in safety, alone to the camp; here comes  the whole army, with a cannon with it, and , at its head! The  persons before mentioned, were immediately taken as prisoners of  war. The cannon guard, was commanded to take them, and guard  them into the camp, as such; and a loaded cannon, drove close behind  them.
But to describe this scene, would defy the pen of a Scott. Guns  were snapping in every quarter. The yellings, the howlings, the  screamings, we think, were never equalled! We thought, at the  time, that we might perhaps, hear something like it, if we were at  the gates of perdition; hearing the howlings of the miserable; but  we think, except that could exceed it, it never was equalled. After  they got into the camp, there was a strong guard placed around them.  It will be seen by this, how much reliance could be placed in the [p. 36]
next morning, and the letter had to be carried some thirty or forty miles. Here was another piece of legerdemain. was turned into militia, to hide up his wickedness. We had this account from the mouth of Samuel Tillary; he is a Clerk of the Circuit Court in and acts as clerk for .
Let the reader particularly notice, that this , was well acquainted with the operations of the mob, for the space of five years; having been the leader of it once himself, at the time it raged in ; and had been petitioned, again and again, after he was Governor, to stop its ravages; and in every instance refused to do it. He now perfectly knew that the whole difficulty, had originated in consequence of its violence and plunder: yet notwithstanding this, he issued the above order. , said, that if it had not been for the vote, which the Mormons gave at the late election, he would have exterminated them before.
After the citizens of were made acquainted with the fact, that was there, by the ’s order, they ceased to take any measures for defence; but submitted immediately.
In the meantime, the army employed itself in destroying the cornfields, potatoes and turnips, and in taking horses and plundering houses. Houses were searched by them, as closely to find money, as a man would be searched by a set of Arabs after a shipwreck. Every dollar was carried off, that could be found, while the lives of the owners were threatened, if they offered the least resistance. Cattle, hogs and sheep, were shot down, and left on the ground to rot. Men, women and children, were insulted and abused, in a most brutal manner!
We return again to the maneuvering of the Officers. In the evening of the second day after their arrival, they sent a messenger to a number of persons, informing them, that they wanted them to come into their camp; as they wished to have a consultation with them: and they pledged their sacred honors, that they should be at liberty to return to the town, by eight o’clock, the next morning. The persons, called for, were , , , Joseph Smith Jr., and . It was supposed that confidence might be placed in the word of Major and Brigadier Generals; and accordingly, the persons called for, went into their camp.
When they started to go, instead of meeting a white flag, as was expected to conduct them in safety, alone to the camp; here comes the whole army, with a cannon with it, and , at its head! The persons before mentioned, were immediately taken as prisoners of war. The cannon guard, was commanded to take them, and guard them into the camp, as such; and a loaded cannon, drove close behind them.
But to describe this scene, would defy the pen of a Scott. Guns were snapping in every quarter. The yellings, the howlings, the screamings, we think, were never equalled! We thought, at the time, that we might perhaps, hear something like it, if we were at the gates of perdition; hearing the howlings of the miserable; but we think, except that could exceed it, it never was equalled. After they got into the camp, there was a strong guard placed around them. It will be seen by this, how much reliance could be placed in the [p. 36]
Page 36