Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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where I was living, I committed my family to the protection of  heaven, and leaving the house on the opposite side, I took a path  which led up the hill, following in the trail of three of my breth ren that had fled from the shop. While ascending the hill, we  were discovered by the mob, who immediately fired at us, and  continued so to do till we reached the summit. In descending  the hill I secreted myself in a thicket of bushes, where I lay till  eight o’clock in the evening, at which time I heard a female  voice calling my name in an under tone, telling me that the mob  had gone and there was no danger. I immediately left the thicket  and went to the house of Benjamin Lewis, where I found my  family (who had fled there) in safety, and two of my friends mor tally wounded, one of whom died before morning.
Here we passed that awful night in deep and painful reflections  on the scenes of the preceding evening. After day-light appear ed, some four or five men, with myself, who had escaped with our  lives from the horrid massacre, repaired, as soon as possible, to  the mills, to learn the condition of our friends, whose fate we had  truly anticipated.
When we arrived at the house of , we found Mr.  [Levi] Merrick’s body lying in the rear of the house, ’s in  front, literally mangled from head to foot. We were informed by  Miss Rebecca Judd, who was an eye-witness, that he was shot  with his own gun, after he had given it up, and then was cut to  pieces with an old corn cutter, by a , of , who keeps a ferry on Grand river, and who has since repeat edly boasted of this act of savage barbarity. ’s body  we found in the house, and after viewing these corpses we imme diately went to the black-smith’s shop, where we found nine of  our friends, eight of whom were already dead, the other, Mr.  [Simon] Cox, of Indiana, struggling in the agonies of death, and soon ex pired. We immediately prepared and carried them to a place of  interment. This last office of kindness, due to the relics of de parted friends, was not attended with the customary ceremonies  nor decency—for we were in jeopardy, every moment expecting  to be fired on by the mob, who we supposed were lying in am bush, waiting for the first opportunity to despatch the remaining  few, who were providentially preserved from the slaughter of the  preceding day; however, we accomplished without molestation  this painful task. The place of burying was a vault in the ground,  formerly intended for a well, into which we threw the bodies of  our friends promiscuously. Among those slain, I will mention  Sardius Smith, son of , about nine years old, who,  through fear, had crawled under the bellows in the shop, where  he remained until the massacre was over, when he was discover ed by a Mr. [Ira] Glaze of Carroll county, who presented his rifle near  the boy’s head and literally blowed off the upper part of it. Mr.  Stanly, of Carroll, told me afterwards that Glaze boasted of this  deed all over the county.
The number killed and mortally wounded in this wanton  slaughter was eighteen or nineteen, whose names, as far as I can [p. 40]
where I was living, I committed my family to the protection of heaven, and leaving the house on the opposite side, I took a path which led up the hill, following in the trail of three of my brethren that had fled from the shop. While ascending the hill, we were discovered by the mob, who immediately fired at us, and continued so to do till we reached the summit. In descending the hill I secreted myself in a thicket of bushes, where I lay till eight o’clock in the evening, at which time I heard a female voice calling my name in an under tone, telling me that the mob had gone and there was no danger. I immediately left the thicket and went to the house of Benjamin Lewis, where I found my family (who had fled there) in safety, and two of my friends mortally wounded, one of whom died before morning.
Here we passed that awful night in deep and painful reflections on the scenes of the preceding evening. After day-light appeared, some four or five men, with myself, who had escaped with our lives from the horrid massacre, repaired, as soon as possible, to the mills, to learn the condition of our friends, whose fate we had truly anticipated.
When we arrived at the house of , we found Mr. Levi Merrick’s body lying in the rear of the house, ’s in front, literally mangled from head to foot. We were informed by Miss Rebecca Judd, who was an eye-witness, that he was shot with his own gun, after he had given it up, and then was cut to pieces with an old corn cutter, by a , of , who keeps a ferry on Grand river, and who has since repeatedly boasted of this act of savage barbarity. ’s body we found in the house, and after viewing these corpses we immediately went to the black-smith’s shop, where we found nine of our friends, eight of whom were already dead, the other, Mr. Simon Cox, of Indiana, struggling in the agonies of death, and soon expired. We immediately prepared and carried them to a place of interment. This last office of kindness, due to the relics of departed friends, was not attended with the customary ceremonies nor decency—for we were in jeopardy, every moment expecting to be fired on by the mob, who we supposed were lying in ambush, waiting for the first opportunity to despatch the remaining few, who were providentially preserved from the slaughter of the preceding day; however, we accomplished without molestation this painful task. The place of burying was a vault in the ground, formerly intended for a well, into which we threw the bodies of our friends promiscuously. Among those slain, I will mention Sardius Smith, son of , about nine years old, who, through fear, had crawled under the bellows in the shop, where he remained until the massacre was over, when he was discovered by a Mr. Ira Glaze of Carroll county, who presented his rifle near the boy’s head and literally blowed off the upper part of it. Mr. Stanly, of Carroll, told me afterwards that Glaze boasted of this deed all over the county.
The number killed and mortally wounded in this wanton slaughter was eighteen or nineteen, whose names, as far as I can [p. 40]
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