Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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recollect, were as follows: , Levi Merrick, Elias  Benner, Josiah Fuller, Benjamin Lewis, Alexander Campbell,  , Sardius Smith, George Richards, Mr. [William] Napier, Mr.  Harmer [Austin Hammer], Mr. [Simon] Cox, , , Wm. Merrick, a boy  8 or 9 years old, and three or four more whose names I do not  recollect, as they were strangers to me. Among the wounded  who recovered were Isaac Laney [Leany], who had six balls shot through  him, two through his body, one through each arm, and the other  two through his hips. Nathan K. Knight shot through the body,  Mr. [William] Yokum, who was severely wounded, besides being shot  through the head; , —— [George] Myers, , , and several others. Miss Mary Stedwell, while fleeing,  was shot through the hand and fainting, fell over a log, into which  they shot upwards of twenty balls.
To finish their work of destruction, this band of murder ers, composed of men from , , , ,  and Carroll counties, led by some of the principal men of that  section of the upper country, proceeded to rob the houses, wagons  and tents, of bedding and clothing; drove off horses and wagons,  leaving widows and orphans destitute of the necessaries of life;  and even stripped the clothing from the bodies of the slain!
According to their own account, they fired seven rounds in this  awful massacre, making upwards of fifteen hundred shots at a  little company of about thirty in number!
I certify the above to be a true statement of facts relative to  the above mentioned massacre, according to my best recollection.
(Signed) .
.
’ CERTIFICATE OF THE MASSACRE.
A short time previous to the massacre at , we made  peace with the mob characters living near us, as declaration had  been made by the leaders of the band that all persons who would  not take up arms against the society should, with the Mormons,  be driven out of the ; and thus drawing the division line so  close that we thought it necessary to ascertain the feelings of our  neighbors around us. We met them, and an agreement was en tered into between us that we would live in peace let others do as  they would. A large number of our company living at the mill at  that time were emigrants who had just come into the place. On  the 30th of October, 1838, without apprehending any danger  whatever from the mob, we were visited by about three hun dred mounted men, coming with great speed, and fell upon us  with the ferocity of tigers. They were not discovered until  within one hundred and fifty yards of us. They immediately  commenced firing upon us, without asking us to surrender, or  even giving us to understand what they wanted, only as we were  taught by the sound of guns, the groans of the dying, and the  screams of the women and children, being only about forty in  number, and wholly unprepared to engage in any contest what ever. We were forced to take shelter under cover of an old log  building, used as a blacksmith-shop, which was neither chincked  or mudded. [p. 41]
recollect, were as follows: , Levi Merrick, Elias Benner, Josiah Fuller, Benjamin Lewis, Alexander Campbell, , Sardius Smith, George Richards, Mr. William Napier, Mr. Harmer Austin Hammer, Mr. Simon Cox, , , Wm. Merrick, a boy 8 or 9 years old, and three or four more whose names I do not recollect, as they were strangers to me. Among the wounded who recovered were Isaac Laney Leany, who had six balls shot through him, two through his body, one through each arm, and the other two through his hips. Nathan K. Knight shot through the body, Mr. William Yokum, who was severely wounded, besides being shot through the head; , —— George Myers, , , and several others. Miss Mary Stedwell, while fleeing, was shot through the hand and fainting, fell over a log, into which they shot upwards of twenty balls.
To finish their work of destruction, this band of murderers, composed of men from , , , , and Carroll counties, led by some of the principal men of that section of the upper country, proceeded to rob the houses, wagons and tents, of bedding and clothing; drove off horses and wagons, leaving widows and orphans destitute of the necessaries of life; and even stripped the clothing from the bodies of the slain!
According to their own account, they fired seven rounds in this awful massacre, making upwards of fifteen hundred shots at a little company of about thirty in number!
I certify the above to be a true statement of facts relative to the above mentioned massacre, according to my best recollection.
(Signed) .
.
’ CERTIFICATE OF THE MASSACRE.
A short time previous to the massacre at , we made peace with the mob characters living near us, as declaration had been made by the leaders of the band that all persons who would not take up arms against the society should, with the Mormons, be driven out of the ; and thus drawing the division line so close that we thought it necessary to ascertain the feelings of our neighbors around us. We met them, and an agreement was entered into between us that we would live in peace let others do as they would. A large number of our company living at the mill at that time were emigrants who had just come into the place. On the 30th of October, 1838, without apprehending any danger whatever from the mob, we were visited by about three hundred mounted men, coming with great speed, and fell upon us with the ferocity of tigers. They were not discovered until within one hundred and fifty yards of us. They immediately commenced firing upon us, without asking us to surrender, or even giving us to understand what they wanted, only as we were taught by the sound of guns, the groans of the dying, and the screams of the women and children, being only about forty in number, and wholly unprepared to engage in any contest whatever. We were forced to take shelter under cover of an old log building, used as a blacksmith-shop, which was neither chincked or mudded. [p. 41]
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