Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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we could stay until spring; he replied that was the first conclusion,  but he had just received new orders from the , and that was,  that all Mormons should be driven out of the forthwith. I then  asked him if the way was not guarded, so that I would be in no dan ger in passing the roads. He said he would give me a pass or ticket  which would carry me safely through the , provided I continued  to travel in an eastward course, and minded my own business. We  soon parted; and on the next day I went to the mill and received my  pass, which reads as follows. Having the original in my possession  I give it verbatim.
November 13, 1838.
This is to certify that , a Mormon, is permitted to  leave and pass through the State of , in an eastward direc tion, unmolested during good behavior.
,
Captain of Militia.
The next day Hiram Comstock, the ’s brother, with two or  three others, brought a prisoner to me to see if I knew him; I told  them I had seen him, but did not know his name. After questioning  me for some time, told me to go with them into their camp, and said  I might consider myself a prisoner. They kept me until the next  day, and set me at liberty, charging me to be gone from the  forthwith. I was compelled to comply with these orders, at the  sacrifice of all I had, and leave the State of , agreeably to the  order of the of that ; a thing unprecedented in the  history of the world. I was taught to hold sacred the rights of man  in my childhood. I was raised in Kentucky, born in 1814, and lived  in that State until April, 1837. Such doctrine as taught and practiced  in , by the officers of that was never taught neither  practiced in my native State.
.
We will now return to the prisoners. They had meanly betrayed  us into their hands; we were kept in their camp until the third day  of November; we then started for . Let us here ob serve that they increased our number, having added to it Messrs.   and . By our special request, they  took us into to see our families, whom we found, when we  got there, living on parched corn, as the town was so closely infested  they could not get out. I will not attempt to describe this parting  scene. I leave every person to place themselves in our situation and  then judge for themselves.
In writing this narrative it is no part of our intention to play upon  the passions of the public, but give a faithful narrative of facts and  then leave it. After we arrived at , the county seat of  , we served the same purpose that a caravan of wild  animals would for a show, as hundreds of people called to see us.  We were put into an old house and left to sleep on some blankets we  had with us. Shortly after we started from , a messenger  came riding after us with a demand from , to take us back.  With this, would not comply. Upon the whole, we were  treated at with respect. We were boarded at a tavern, and [p. 45]
we could stay until spring; he replied that was the first conclusion, but he had just received new orders from the , and that was, that all Mormons should be driven out of the forthwith. I then asked him if the way was not guarded, so that I would be in no danger in passing the roads. He said he would give me a pass or ticket which would carry me safely through the , provided I continued to travel in an eastward course, and minded my own business. We soon parted; and on the next day I went to the mill and received my pass, which reads as follows. Having the original in my possession I give it verbatim.
November 13, 1838.
This is to certify that , a Mormon, is permitted to leave and pass through the State of , in an eastward direction, unmolested during good behavior.
,
Captain of Militia.
The next day Hiram Comstock, the ’s brother, with two or three others, brought a prisoner to me to see if I knew him; I told them I had seen him, but did not know his name. After questioning me for some time, told me to go with them into their camp, and said I might consider myself a prisoner. They kept me until the next day, and set me at liberty, charging me to be gone from the forthwith. I was compelled to comply with these orders, at the sacrifice of all I had, and leave the State of , agreeably to the order of the of that ; a thing unprecedented in the history of the world. I was taught to hold sacred the rights of man in my childhood. I was raised in Kentucky, born in 1814, and lived in that State until April, 1837. Such doctrine as taught and practiced in , by the officers of that was never taught neither practiced in my native State.
.
We will now return to the prisoners. They had meanly betrayed us into their hands; we were kept in their camp until the third day of November; we then started for . Let us here observe that they increased our number, having added to it Messrs. and . By our special request, they took us into to see our families, whom we found, when we got there, living on parched corn, as the town was so closely infested they could not get out. I will not attempt to describe this parting scene. I leave every person to place themselves in our situation and then judge for themselves.
In writing this narrative it is no part of our intention to play upon the passions of the public, but give a faithful narrative of facts and then leave it. After we arrived at , the county seat of , we served the same purpose that a caravan of wild animals would for a show, as hundreds of people called to see us. We were put into an old house and left to sleep on some blankets we had with us. Shortly after we started from , a messenger came riding after us with a demand from , to take us back. With this, would not comply. Upon the whole, we were treated at with respect. We were boarded at a tavern, and [p. 45]
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