Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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soon were taken into the tavern house. A man was appointed to see  that we had every thing we wanted. They dispensed with their  guards, and we were at liberty to go where we pleased, and return  when it suited us. These privileges were not granted us at first, but  after we had been there a few days. At first we were put into an old  house and closely guarded. While we were there, , a  lawyer of celebrity, and leader of the mob, confessed  in our presence, and in the presence of many others, that the mob, was a wanton attack upon the saints without cause, and  he said he presumed that the attack then made was of the same char acter.
We state this to show that the men of intelligence in ,  knew that they were again engaged in robbing a people of their rights.  Indeed, went so far as to say, that if ever the mobs  attacked us again, he would fight for us. We will leave here the  prisoners and relate what took place in . After ’s arrival at , , I think, was the Gen eral’s name, that was sent to . On his arrival there, he  placed guards around the town, so that no person might pass out or in  without permission. All the men in town were then taken and put  under guard, and a court of inquiry was instituted, with  on the bench; the said belonged to the mob and was  one of the leaders of it from the time mobbing first commenced in  . The Attorney’s name I have forgotten, if I ever  knew, but belonged to ’s army.
After two or three days’ investigation, every man was honorably  acquitted. then ordered every family to be out of   in ten days, with permission to go to , and there  tarry until spring, and then leave the under pain of extermina tion. This was on the first of November, the weather was very cold,  more so than usual, for that season of the year; and, in keeping this  order of ’s they had to leave their crops and houses,  and to live in tents and wagons in this inclement season of the year.  As for their flocks and herds the mob had delivered them from the  trouble of taking care of them, or from the pain of seeing them  starve to death, by stealing them. An arrangement was made in  which it was stipulated that a committee of twelve, which had been  previously appointed, should have the privilege of going from to for the term of four weeks, for the purpose  of conveying their crops from to . The committee  were to wear white badges on their hats for their protection.
But in a short time after this arrangement was made,  withdrew with his army, and the mob rose up as soon as the army  had gone, and forbid the committee from coming again into under pain of death. By this the mob secured unto them selves several hundred thousand bushels of corn, besides large quan tities of oats, and the saints were left to seek their bread and shelter  where they could find it.
We will now return to the prisoners in . Shortly  after our arrival in , Colonel from the  army of , came with orders from who was  commander-in-chief of the expedition, to have us forwarded forthwith [p. 46]
soon were taken into the tavern house. A man was appointed to see that we had every thing we wanted. They dispensed with their guards, and we were at liberty to go where we pleased, and return when it suited us. These privileges were not granted us at first, but after we had been there a few days. At first we were put into an old house and closely guarded. While we were there, , a lawyer of celebrity, and leader of the mob, confessed in our presence, and in the presence of many others, that the mob, was a wanton attack upon the saints without cause, and he said he presumed that the attack then made was of the same character.
We state this to show that the men of intelligence in , knew that they were again engaged in robbing a people of their rights. Indeed, went so far as to say, that if ever the mobs attacked us again, he would fight for us. We will leave here the prisoners and relate what took place in . After ’s arrival at , , I think, was the General’s name, that was sent to . On his arrival there, he placed guards around the town, so that no person might pass out or in without permission. All the men in town were then taken and put under guard, and a court of inquiry was instituted, with on the bench; the said belonged to the mob and was one of the leaders of it from the time mobbing first commenced in . The Attorney’s name I have forgotten, if I ever knew, but belonged to ’s army.
After two or three days’ investigation, every man was honorably acquitted. then ordered every family to be out of in ten days, with permission to go to , and there tarry until spring, and then leave the under pain of extermination. This was on the first of November, the weather was very cold, more so than usual, for that season of the year; and, in keeping this order of ’s they had to leave their crops and houses, and to live in tents and wagons in this inclement season of the year. As for their flocks and herds the mob had delivered them from the trouble of taking care of them, or from the pain of seeing them starve to death, by stealing them. An arrangement was made in which it was stipulated that a committee of twelve, which had been previously appointed, should have the privilege of going from to for the term of four weeks, for the purpose of conveying their crops from to . The committee were to wear white badges on their hats for their protection.
But in a short time after this arrangement was made, withdrew with his army, and the mob rose up as soon as the army had gone, and forbid the committee from coming again into under pain of death. By this the mob secured unto themselves several hundred thousand bushels of corn, besides large quantities of oats, and the saints were left to seek their bread and shelter where they could find it.
We will now return to the prisoners in . Shortly after our arrival in , Colonel from the army of , came with orders from who was commander-in-chief of the expedition, to have us forwarded forthwith [p. 46]
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