Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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speechifying, as the papers of , published at the time, abundantly testify, the petition and memorial were laid on the table until the July following; thus utterly refusing to grant the memorialists their request, thereby refusing to investigate the subject; and thus it stands to this day, uninvestigated by any legal authority.
After we were cast into prison we heard nothing but threatenings, that if any judge or jury, or court of any kind should clear any of us that we should never get out of the alive. This soon determined our course, and that was to escape out of their hands as soon as we could, and by any means we could. After we had been some length of time in prison, we demanded a habeas corpus of , one of judges, which, with some considerable reluctance, was granted. Great threatenings were made at this time by the mob, that if any of us were liberated we should get out of the alive. After the investigation of our number was released from prison by the decision of the ; the remainder were committed to jail. He also returned with them until a favorable opportunity offered, which, through the friendship of the sheriff, Mr. Samuel Hadley and the jailor, Mr. Samuel Tillery, he was let out of the jail secretly in the night; and being solemnly warned by them to be out of the with as little delay as possible, he made his escape. Being pursued by a body of armed men, it was through the direction of a kind providence that he escaped out of their hands and safely arrived in , Illinois. This was in February, A. D. 1839.
In the May following, the remainder that were in , were taken to to be tried by a grand jury of the principal mobbers, in order to see if a bill of indictment could be found as could be expected from the characters of the jury. Bills were found, they obtained a change of venue to ; accordingly, the sheriff of , with guards, started to take them from to . On their way, after journeying a day or two, one evening the guard got drunk, they left them, and also made their escape to , Illinois.
Those that were in jail were brought to trial, but no bill of indictment was found against and Norman Shearer, and they were released and sent home. A bill was found against , Morris Phelps, and for murder, and also a man by the name of for robbery. They also obtained a change of venue to , and were carried thither and put into jail and there remained until the fourth of July. At this time the town was all hilarity and mirth at the celebration. They also made a flag and had it placed over the jail doors. In the evening, when the jailor brought in their suppers they walked out at the door—that is, , Morris Phelps and ; continued, the others were closely pursued, and was retaken and carried back; but the other two effected their escape to the State of . Some time afterwards had his trial, and was acquitted. remains in prison unto this day, 26th October, 1839.
As to those that were left in the counties of and , they were making all possible exertions to get away all the winter, contrary to the stipulations of and , granting [p. 50]
speechifying, as the papers of , published at the time, abundantly testify, the petition and memorial were laid on the table until the July following; thus utterly refusing to grant the memorialists their request, thereby refusing to investigate the subject; and thus it stands to this day, uninvestigated by any legal authority.
After we were cast into prison we heard nothing but threatenings, that if any judge or jury, or court of any kind should clear any of us that we should never get out of the alive. This soon determined our course, and that was to escape out of their hands as soon as we could, and by any means we could. After we had been some length of time in prison, we demanded a habeas corpus of , one of judges, which, with some considerable reluctance, was granted. Great threatenings were made at this time by the mob, that if any of us were liberated we should get out of the alive. After the investigation of our number was released from prison by the decision of the ; the remainder were committed to jail. He also returned with them until a favorable opportunity offered, which, through the friendship of the sheriff, Mr. Samuel Hadley and the jailor, Mr. Samuel Tillery, he was let out of the jail secretly in the night; and being solemnly warned by them to be out of the with as little delay as possible, he made his escape. Being pursued by a body of armed men, it was through the direction of a kind providence that he escaped out of their hands and safely arrived in , Illinois. This was in February, A. D. 1839.
In the May following, the remainder that were in , were taken to to be tried by a grand jury of the principal mobbers, in order to see if a bill of indictment could be found as could be expected from the characters of the jury. Bills were found, they obtained a change of venue to ; accordingly, the sheriff of , with guards, started to take them from to . On their way, after journeying a day or two, one evening the guard got drunk, they left them, and also made their escape to , Illinois.
Those that were in jail were brought to trial, but no bill of indictment was found against and Norman Shearer, and they were released and sent home. A bill was found against , Morris Phelps, and for murder, and also a man by the name of for robbery. They also obtained a change of venue to , and were carried thither and put into jail and there remained until the fourth of July. At this time the town was all hilarity and mirth at the celebration. They also made a flag and had it placed over the jail doors. In the evening, when the jailor brought in their suppers they walked out at the door—that is, , Morris Phelps and ; continued, the others were closely pursued, and was retaken and carried back; but the other two effected their escape to the State of . Some time afterwards had his trial, and was acquitted. remains in prison unto this day, 26th October, 1839.
As to those that were left in the counties of and , they were making all possible exertions to get away all the winter, contrary to the stipulations of and , granting [p. 50]
Page 50