Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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them the privilege of staying until spring. Bodies of armed men  were riding through the town of in the county of ,  threatening death to them if they were not out in the month of Feb ruary, and otherwise insulting them. they continued, however, to  exert themselves with all possible means in their power; many of  them were sick, large numbers of them had no teams nor wagons.  Having been robbed, yes, completely robbed of all they had, great  exertions, therefore, had to be made by those who had means.  Through great exertions and timely perseverance they succeeded in  getting them safely into the State of , where we all are now,  and where we have met with a kind reception.
Public meetings were held in —contributions raised to as sist the suffering, and every exertion which humanity dictated was  made for our relief—but still we are, as a people, poor and destitute.  We have been robbed of our all, and many of us are without houses,  living in tents and wagons. In consequence of our exposure, we  have suffered this summer much sickness and numbers have died, and  our prospects for the ensuing winter are gloomy. But gloomy as they  are, still we are not discouraged. A large majority of us are farmers,  but our teams, as well as our flocks and herds, and all our farming  materials, were taken from us. Many who were independent are now  working by day’s work to maintain their families; numbers of them  old men, sixty years old and upwards. Such is our true situation— and, as such, we make our Appeal to the American People. [p. 51]
them the privilege of staying until spring. Bodies of armed men were riding through the town of in the county of , threatening death to them if they were not out in the month of February, and otherwise insulting them. they continued, however, to exert themselves with all possible means in their power; many of them were sick, large numbers of them had no teams nor wagons. Having been robbed, yes, completely robbed of all they had, great exertions, therefore, had to be made by those who had means. Through great exertions and timely perseverance they succeeded in getting them safely into the State of , where we all are now, and where we have met with a kind reception.
Public meetings were held in —contributions raised to assist the suffering, and every exertion which humanity dictated was made for our relief—but still we are, as a people, poor and destitute. We have been robbed of our all, and many of us are without houses, living in tents and wagons. In consequence of our exposure, we have suffered this summer much sickness and numbers have died, and our prospects for the ensuing winter are gloomy. But gloomy as they are, still we are not discouraged. A large majority of us are farmers, but our teams, as well as our flocks and herds, and all our farming materials, were taken from us. Many who were independent are now working by day’s work to maintain their families; numbers of them old men, sixty years old and upwards. Such is our true situation—and, as such, we make our Appeal to the American People. [p. 51]
Page 51