Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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to remain, for the space of twenty-four hours, during which time no  one was permitted to administer to him comfort or consolation, and  after he was removed from that situation he lived but a few hours.  The destruction of property, at and about , is very great.  Many are stripped bare as it were, and others partially so; indeed,  take us a body, at this time, we are a poor and afflicted people, and if  we are compelled to leave the in the spring, many, yes, a large  portion of our society, will have to be removed at the expense of the  , as those who otherwise might have helped them, are now de barred that privilege in consequence of the deed of trust we were com pelled to sign, which deed so operates upon our real estate, that it will  sell for but little or nothing at this time. We have now made a brief  statement of some of the most prominent features of the troubles that  have befallen our people since their first settlement in this , and  we believe that these persecutions have come in consequence of our  religious faith, and not for any immorality on our part. That instances  have been of late, where individuals have trespassed upon the rights  of others, and thereby broken the laws of the land, we will not pre tend to deny, but yet we do believe that no crime can be substantiated  against any of the people who have a standing in our church, of an  earlier date than the difficulties in . And when it is  considered that the rights of this people have been trampled upon from  time to time, with impunity, and abuses heaped upon them almost in numerable, it ought, in some degree, to palliate for any infraction of  the law, which may have been made on the part of our people.
The late order of , to drive us from this , or  exterminate us, is a thing so novel, unlawful, tyranical and oppres sive, that we have been induced to draw up this memorial, and pre sent this statement of our case to your honorable body, praying that a  law may be passed rescinding the order of the to drive us  from the , and also giving us the sanction of the Legislature to  inherit our lands in peace—we ask an expression of the Legislature,  disapproving the conduct of those who compelled us to sign a deed of  trust, and also disapproving of any man or set of men, taking our pro perty in consequence of that deed of trust, and appropriating it to the  payment of debts not contracted by us, or for the payment of damages  sustained in consequence of trespasses committed by others. We  have no common stock, our property is individual property, and we  feel willing to pay our debts as other individuals do, but we are not  willing to be bound for other people’s debts also.
The arms which were taken from us here, which we understand to  be about 630, besides swords and pistols, we care not so much about,  as we do the pay for them; only we are bound to do military duty,  which we are willing to do, and which we think was sufficiently  manifested by the raising of a volunteer company last fall, at , when called upon by , to raise troops for the frontier.
The arms given up by us we consider were worth between twelve  and fifteen thousand dollars, but we understand they have been greatly  damaged since taken, and at this time, probably would not bring  near their former value. And as they were, both here and in , taken by the militia, and consequantly by the authority of  the , we therefore ask your honorable body to cause an appro [p. 57]
to remain, for the space of twenty-four hours, during which time no one was permitted to administer to him comfort or consolation, and after he was removed from that situation he lived but a few hours. The destruction of property, at and about , is very great. Many are stripped bare as it were, and others partially so; indeed, take us a body, at this time, we are a poor and afflicted people, and if we are compelled to leave the in the spring, many, yes, a large portion of our society, will have to be removed at the expense of the , as those who otherwise might have helped them, are now debarred that privilege in consequence of the deed of trust we were compelled to sign, which deed so operates upon our real estate, that it will sell for but little or nothing at this time. We have now made a brief statement of some of the most prominent features of the troubles that have befallen our people since their first settlement in this , and we believe that these persecutions have come in consequence of our religious faith, and not for any immorality on our part. That instances have been of late, where individuals have trespassed upon the rights of others, and thereby broken the laws of the land, we will not pretend to deny, but yet we do believe that no crime can be substantiated against any of the people who have a standing in our church, of an earlier date than the difficulties in . And when it is considered that the rights of this people have been trampled upon from time to time, with impunity, and abuses heaped upon them almost innumerable, it ought, in some degree, to palliate for any infraction of the law, which may have been made on the part of our people.
The late order of , to drive us from this , or exterminate us, is a thing so novel, unlawful, tyranical and oppressive, that we have been induced to draw up this memorial, and present this statement of our case to your honorable body, praying that a law may be passed rescinding the order of the to drive us from the , and also giving us the sanction of the Legislature to inherit our lands in peace—we ask an expression of the Legislature, disapproving the conduct of those who compelled us to sign a deed of trust, and also disapproving of any man or set of men, taking our property in consequence of that deed of trust, and appropriating it to the payment of debts not contracted by us, or for the payment of damages sustained in consequence of trespasses committed by others. We have no common stock, our property is individual property, and we feel willing to pay our debts as other individuals do, but we are not willing to be bound for other people’s debts also.
The arms which were taken from us here, which we understand to be about 630, besides swords and pistols, we care not so much about, as we do the pay for them; only we are bound to do military duty, which we are willing to do, and which we think was sufficiently manifested by the raising of a volunteer company last fall, at , when called upon by , to raise troops for the frontier.
The arms given up by us we consider were worth between twelve and fifteen thousand dollars, but we understand they have been greatly damaged since taken, and at this time, probably would not bring near their former value. And as they were, both here and in , taken by the militia, and consequantly by the authority of the , we therefore ask your honorable body to cause an appro [p. 57]
Page 57