Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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AN APPEAL TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE.
 
The “Latter Day Saints” commenced their settlements in , in August, 1831. The first settlement was made in , on the west line of the ; not far from the mission ary station of the Rev. , a Baptist missionary among  the Indians. At this time, was very thinly set tled; the quarter part of its settlers were what is called, in the  western country, “squatters;” that is, persons who settle on the  public lands without purchasing them. Some considerable part  of had not come into market. On these lands  considerable settlements had been made; cabins built, and some  land cleared.
When the “Latter Day Saints” began to emigrate into the  country, there was a good deal of uneasiness manifested by a cer tain portion of the settlers, at first; principally, by those who had  settled on the public lands, lest the new settlers should be dispos ed to purchase, at the land sales, which were expected to take  place that season, the lands on which they had made improve ments; or enter such lands as might be subject to entry, that had  been taken possession of. But this uneasiness gradually lessened,  until it finally died away. The sales came on, purchases were  made by every man as suited him; and no difficulty occurred:  every man went to building on, and improving his land, as seemed  good to himself.
Shortly after the first settlement was made, a considerable tide  of emigration set in, which continued to increase until the summer  of 1833; by this time, the emigration of the saints was far greater  than that of all others. This began to create great uneasiness;  murmurings, and complainings were heard continually about it,  and about the rapid improvements which were making in that  . From murmurings they went to holding public meet ings, to take measures to put a stop to the emigration, and not  only put a stop to the emigration, but drive those out of the , who were settled there.
These meetings were public, called and held in the face of the  government, published in the public papers. At these meetings,  they publicly declared that they would put the laws of the country  at defiance, in order to accomplish their object, as well as justice  and humanity,which finally they did.
In order to justify themselves in violating the laws of both God  and man; the laws, both of the State of and the , they had recourse to fabricating, and circulating the most [p. [7]]
AN APPEAL TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE.
 
The “Latter Day Saints” commenced their settlements in , in August, 1831. The first settlement was made in , on the west line of the ; not far from the missionary station of the Rev. , a Baptist missionary among the Indians. At this time, was very thinly settled; the quarter part of its settlers were what is called, in the western country, “squatters;” that is, persons who settle on the public lands without purchasing them. Some considerable part of had not come into market. On these lands considerable settlements had been made; cabins built, and some land cleared.
When the “Latter Day Saints” began to emigrate into the country, there was a good deal of uneasiness manifested by a certain portion of the settlers, at first; principally, by those who had settled on the public lands, lest the new settlers should be disposed to purchase, at the land sales, which were expected to take place that season, the lands on which they had made improvements; or enter such lands as might be subject to entry, that had been taken possession of. But this uneasiness gradually lessened, until it finally died away. The sales came on, purchases were made by every man as suited him; and no difficulty occurred: every man went to building on, and improving his land, as seemed good to himself.
Shortly after the first settlement was made, a considerable tide of emigration set in, which continued to increase until the summer of 1833; by this time, the emigration of the saints was far greater than that of all others. This began to create great uneasiness; murmurings, and complainings were heard continually about it, and about the rapid improvements which were making in that . From murmurings they went to holding public meetings, to take measures to put a stop to the emigration, and not only put a stop to the emigration, but drive those out of the , who were settled there.
These meetings were public, called and held in the face of the government, published in the public papers. At these meetings, they publicly declared that they would put the laws of the country at defiance, in order to accomplish their object, as well as justice and humanity,which finally they did.
In order to justify themselves in violating the laws of both God and man; the laws, both of the State of and the , they had recourse to fabricating, and circulating the most [p. [7]]
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