Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 12
image
robbed the henroosts, and carried off everything which  was valuable, they burned the houses, amounting in all to  upwards of two hundred; and then commenced a general  destruction of the timber on the land. Some tracts which  were well timbered, were soon stripped of every tree.  Such of the farms as they did not occupy, they took all  the rails from and used them for their own purposes.  There were several thousand acres of land thus seized, on  which improvements were made to a considerable extent,  and the owners utterly forbid to enjoy them, and they  have been compelled to sell them for no valuable consid eration, while those usurpers were quietly enjoying the  good of them. While these brutalities were going on,  the public papers were constantly employed in giving pub licity to the foulest lies that could be created.
While this mob was engaged in this course of plunder,  for it was altogether a plundering and robbing business;  there were outrages of the most extraordinary character  committed by them, ever committed by human beings.  The plans they laid, in order to plunder, were of the most  extraordinary kind. They would serve writs on those  whom they wished to plunder and have them thrown into  jail, and then rob them of every thing they had about them;  watches, money, and other valuables, and bear them off  as plunder. In this business were employed some of the  leading, (some, did I say) better say all the leading men  of the .
Men were caught and tied to trees, and then shot at:  but the heart sickens to tell all the abominations of this  band of barbarians; for who but barbarians could be guilty  of such deeds of cruelty? We wish it to be distinctly un derstood, that the and all the authorities of the  , were acquainted with these cruelties; and no  effort was made to bring the offenders to justice, or to  have the property, thus taken, returned to the owners.  The guns that they ordered to be given up by the authority  of the , they keep until this day. In  this, the government of the , has identified itself in  the number of the plunderers, and become one with those  villians. [p. 12]
robbed the henroosts, and carried off everything which was valuable, they burned the houses, amounting in all to upwards of two hundred; and then commenced a general destruction of the timber on the land. Some tracts which were well timbered, were soon stripped of every tree. Such of the farms as they did not occupy, they took all the rails from and used them for their own purposes. There were several thousand acres of land thus seized, on which improvements were made to a considerable extent, and the owners utterly forbid to enjoy them, and they have been compelled to sell them for no valuable consideration, while those usurpers were quietly enjoying the good of them. While these brutalities were going on, the public papers were constantly employed in giving publicity to the foulest lies that could be created.
While this mob was engaged in this course of plunder, for it was altogether a plundering and robbing business; there were outrages of the most extraordinary character committed by them, ever committed by human beings. The plans they laid, in order to plunder, were of the most extraordinary kind. They would serve writs on those whom they wished to plunder and have them thrown into jail, and then rob them of every thing they had about them; watches, money, and other valuables, and bear them off as plunder. In this business were employed some of the leading, (some, did I say) better say all the leading men of the .
Men were caught and tied to trees, and then shot at: but the heart sickens to tell all the abominations of this band of barbarians; for who but barbarians could be guilty of such deeds of cruelty? We wish it to be distinctly understood, that the and all the authorities of the , were acquainted with these cruelties; and no effort was made to bring the offenders to justice, or to have the property, thus taken, returned to the owners. The guns that they ordered to be given up by the authority of the , they keep until this day. In this, the government of the , has identified itself in the number of the plunderers, and become one with those villians. [p. 12]
Page 12